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Fresh Fish Trade

THREE PORT LANDINGS IN MARCH 54 PERCENT GREATER THAN FEBRUARY

Receipts of fishery products during March at the ports of Boston and Gloucester, Mass., and Portland, Maine, showed an increase of 54 percent compared with landings during the previous month and of ll percent compared with March 1943, according to data published in Current Fishery Statistics No.123 by the Fish and Wildlife Service. March landings totaled 24,962,788 pounds, valued at $1,891,171 to the fishermen, representing an average price of 7.58 cents per pound. This compares with 7.53 cents received in February and 10.75 cents in March 1943. Four items, haddock, cod, rosefish, and pollock, accounted for 93 percent of the total landings during the month.

For the first three months of 1944, the total landings at the three ports amounted to 51,231,075 pounds, valued to the fishermen at $3,788,326. Compared with the same period of 1943, this was a decline of 2 percent in volume. The 1944 total weighted average price was 7.39 cents per pound as compared with 9.91 cents for the first three months of 1943.

Landings by Fishing Vessels at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., and Portland, Maine
Item
March 1944

Three months ending with--
February 1944 March 1943

March 1944

March 1943 Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Pounds Conts Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Cod

7,002,541 8.35 3,077,267 8.35 5,051,891 12.35 11,342,0268.34 9,321,771 11.83 Haddock 9,957,683 8.797,557,492 8.79

7,557,492 8.79 8,491, 084 13.84 20,607,458 8.80 20,392,145 12.51 Hake

451,385 4.59 463,059 4.96 253,252 11.72 1,646,391 4.97 908, 244 9.26 Pollock

1,608, 006 6.99 662,614 6.83 777,867 12.27 2,874,361 6.89 3,458,204 10.64 Cusk

70,649 7.44
55,155 8.58

168,838 11.58 216,683 7.74 274,371 10.98 Halibut

16,217 16.39 7,484 16.71 17,495 31.43 27,900 16.49 31,664 33.37 Mackerel

510 17.65

510 17.65 3,330 14.29 Tlounders: Grey sole

216,699 8.98 141,858 8.90 297,210 11.02 484,029 9.00 630,919 10.66 Lemon sole

22,565 15.64 13,191 15.15 29,480 17.31 48,231 14.30 50,770 18.81 Yellowtail 206,404 7.41 192,708 7.52 174,170 9.79 642,123 7.46 491,175 8.89 Blackback

146,409 9.55 168,240 9.73 112,020 12.07 446,663 9.67 298,830 10.13 Dab

298,440 6.49 97,051 6.30 168,147 8.34 490,971 6.43 377,910 8.57 Other

565 6.90 Rosefish

4,710,635 4.25 3,531,508 4.20 6,670,132 5.30 11,776,921 4.22 15,643,898 5.08 Whiting

7,183 2.91 6,864 2.96 117,685 8.20 18,892 2.99 271,122 7.32 Wolffish

118,374 7.47 37,328 7.49 41,375 9.45 166,004 7.49 71,468 9.59 Eelpout

39,275 3.17 36,714 3.52 33,315 3.86 118,771 3.93 45,545 1.56 Scallops (meats) 13,911 38.00 38,500 37.99 33,429 65.60

83, 818 36.87 71,798 59.34 Other

76,412
82,984
146,460
239,323

197,983 To tal

24,962,788 7.58 16,170,527 7.5322,583,850 10.75_51,21,075 7.39_52,541,712 9.91 By ports: Boston

14,325,552 8.40 9,792,192 8.60 13,186,142 13.10 28,615,344 8.48 32,208,907 11.83 Gloucester

9,901,719 6.59 5,545,781 6.01 8,142,053 7.56 20,152,310 6.15 16,630, 846 7.13 Portland

735,517 4.81 832,554 5.06 1,202,635 6.75 2,453,421 4.93 3,701,959 5.67 Weighted average of prices per pound paid to fishermen,

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NEW BEDFORD LANDINGS CONTINUE TO INCREASE

Fishery products landed by fishing craft at New Bedford, Mass., during the month of March totaled 6,509,000 pounds, valued to the fishermen at $569,619, according to Current Fishery Statistics No. 124 released by the Fish and Wildlife Service. Production was 29 percent greater than in March 1943. An even greater increase in landings--40 percent--was evident over the previous month. The total weighted avere price was 8.75 cents per pound as compared with 11.65 cents for March 1943 and 9.08 cents received in February of this year. Three items, yellowtail, eelpout, and cod, accounted for 75 percent of the total catch.

The total landings for the first three months of 1944 amounted to 15,434,000 pounds, an increase of 26 percent compared with the landings during the same period of 1943. Substantial increases over receipts of 1943 were evident in the landings of cod, haddock, and eelpout. During the first three months of 1944, landings of these species were more than double those of the same period the previous year.

Landings by Fishing Craft at New Bedford, Massachusetts
Item
March 1944

Three months ending with--
February 1944 March 1943

March 1944

March 1943 Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Cod

1,028,544 8.31 377,166 8.12 437,965 11.59 1,714,452 8.18 673,398 11.38 Haddock

911,613 9.00 350,656 9.00 286,800 12.25 1,525,075 9.00 684,412 11.73 Hake 12,525 6.24 1,143 8. 22

15,052 6.54

608 5.92 Eelpout

1,103,111 5.38 1,142,711 9.06 983,400 2.83 2,906, 142 6.8i 1,385,537 3.13 Pollock

27,169 7.07 9,884 6.49 13,105 9.66 38,165 6.89 16,696 9.88 Halibut

2,803 16.16 537 16.95 1,955 32.79 3,510 16.27 2,856 29.45 Flounders: Gray sole

1,535 8.99 240 9.17 4,000 17.35 1,842 9.01 4,515 16.61 Lemon sole

186,006 16.00 49,865 15.75 87,740 17.28 261,731 15.46 146,938 19.49 Yellowtail

2,736,291 7.49 2,527,554 7.50 2,837, 026 11.42 8,165,718 7.50 8,470,492 9.54 Blackback

231,191 9.98 29,602 9.81 149,105 11.59 305,380 9.95 191,630 11.46 Dab

13,277 6.22 1,130 6.46 10,620 8.69 15,362 6.28 70,589 9.77 Fluke 68,958 21.95

65 9.23 68,958 21.95

65 9.23
Rosefish
3,330 4.26

3,330 4.26
Whiting
2,345 2.35

2,345 2.35
Wolffish
2,837 7.47 1,155 7.36

3,460 7.77 4,142 7.44
Scallops (meats)

171,009 38.00 142,763 38.00 186,443 60.12 382,418 37.46 554,252 55.85 Other

20,807 Total

6,508,34 3.5 4,638,737 9,08 5,034,1 1,65 15,434,429 8.58 12,255,290 11.27 Weighted average of prices per pound paid to fishermen,

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4,020 8.08

NEW YORK RECEIPTS GAIN 14 PERCENT IN MARCH

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Increasing 14 percent from February and 4 percent from March 1943, receipts of fresh

frozen fishery products at the New York salt-water market in March totaled 19,719,000 pounds, according to the Service's New York Market News office.

With a few exceptions, increases in important species were seasonal. Whiting, which in the past have been received in great volume at this time of year, failed to show their seasonal increase. Control of whiting prices by OPA reportedly prompted fishermen to avoid the usual whiting grounds and concentrate on fluke, sea bass, and scup, which are not under price control.

Yellowtail receipts continued to decrease, a condition that has prevailed for several years. A probable contributory factor to the immediate decrease is the strict enforcement of the OPA ruling against "Tie-in" purchases. It was the practice, at certain points of production, to sell yellowtails only in combination with other species, particularly ocean pout. When the OPA prohibited the New York dealers from participating in these transactions, quantities of yellowtails were diverted to other markets.

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Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products--Salt-water Market, New York City*

March

March compared with February March I tem

1944

Feb.1944 Mar. 1943 1944 1943 Classification:

Pounds

Percent Percent Pounds Pounds Fish

14,265,000 +24

+ 4 11,531,000 13,774,000 Shellfish, etc,

5,454,000 - 5

+ 4 5,737,000 5,257,000 Total receipts

19,719,000

+ 4 17,268,000 19,031,000 Important Items: Cod

2,526,000 +95

+ 13

1,297,000 2,233,000 Flounders: Blackbacks

928,000 +91

+ 26

485,000 734,000 Yellowtails

2,095,000

37 2,216,000 3,350,000 Fluke

715,000

8
+175

776,000 259,000 Haddock

1,539,000 +76

+ 61

844,000 954,000 Ocean pout

339,000 -26

10

456,000 376,000 Sea bass

250,000

-51
+ 47

506,000 170,000 Scup (porgy)

750,000 +66

+ 60

451,000 470,000 Smelt

197,000

-64

31
542,000

286,000 Spanish mackerel

201,000 -68

+191

631,000 69,000 478,000 + 1

474,000 1,208,000 Clams, hard

2,358,000 +7

+ 13

2,195,000 2,084,000 Lobsters

373,000

+ 2
+ 31

364.000 284,000 Oysters, shell

1,579,000 + 1

+

1,563,000 1,457,000 305,000

52

.840,000 635,000 Arrivals By: Fishing, vessels

2,678,000 +54

1,737,000 2,499,000 Truck, freight, and express

17,041,000 +10

+

15,531,000 16,532,000 *Excluding imports entered at New York City.

Whiting

60

Shrimp

-64

CHICAGO RECEIPTS FOR MARCH RISE 7 PERCENT OVER FEBRUARY

There were 6,543,000 pounds of fresh and frozen fishery products received in the Chicago wholesale market in March, according to the Service's Chicago Fishery Market News office. This was 7 percent over February and 21 percent over March 1943. Large increases in trout and whitefish arrivals resulted from heavy shipments of winter-caught fish from the Canadian Provinces, of the total supplies received, about 20 percent was shipped in by motor trucks, 26 percent by rail express and 54 percent by rail freight.

Item

Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Chicago

March 1944

3 mos.

3 mos, 1944 12 months March compared with

Jan. -Mar. compared with Jan.-Dec. 1944 Feb, 1944. Mar. 1923 1944

3 mos, 1943 1943 Pounds Percent Per cent Pounds

Percent Pounds 4,463,000

+22

+ 21 11,601,000 + 17 42,500,000 1,489,000 -21

+ 15

5,037,000 + 1 29,820,000 501,000 - 3

+ 46

1,714,000 . 8 11,706,000 6,453,000 +7

+ 21 18,352,000 + 10 84,034,000

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Classification: Fresh-water fish Saltwater fish Shellfish, etc,

To tal receipts

Important Items:
Carp
Lake herring
Lake trout
Whitefish
Yellow pike
Cod
Rosefish fillets
Salmon
Shrimp

Leading Sources:
Massachusetts
Wisconsin
Manitoba

Domestic to tal
Imported to tal

Transported by:
Truck
Express
Freight

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20 + 33 + 97 + 78

28 +340 - 9 +429 + 48

953,000

861,000 2,152,000 2,419,000 813,000 854,000 532,000 762,000 734,000

+ 53 + 92 + 43 • 13 +228 + 9 + 45

29

14,419,000 4,100,000 7,002,000 4,671,000 3,733,000 2,627,000 2,689,000 2,505,000 8,793,000

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MARCH RECEIPTS AT SEATTLE SHOW SUBSTANTIAL DECLINE FROM LAST YEAR

Receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products at Seattle during March totaled 3,224,000 pounds, according to the Service's Market News office in that city. This was 34 percent less than February 1944 and 32 percent under March 1943. Receipts of bottom fish, particularly lingcod, rockfish, and sablefish, showed pronounced declines due principally to concentration of the fishing effort of both halibut and otter-trawl fleets on the taking of fish for their livers.

Receipts of oysters showed a heavy increase over 1943. A decrease of canning operations caused diversion of greater quantities to the fresh markets. In the first 3 months of 1944, receipts of fresh oysters were all percent larger than the corresponding period in 1943.

12 months Jan. -Dec. 1943 Pounds 82,505,000

Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Seattle*

March 1944

3 mos.

3 mos. 1944 Item

March
compared with

Jan-Mar. compared
1944 Teb, 1944. Mar. 1943 1944 3. mos, 1943
Classification:
Pounds Percent Percent

Pounds

Percent To tal fish and shellfish

3,224,000

-34 -32 11,993,000 + 6 Important Items: Lingcod

590,000 +39 -34 1,153,000 Rockfish

340,000 +40 -40

725,000 Sablefish

206,000 +186

-42

307,000 Salmon

181,000 -87

-53 2,394,000 + 52 Sole

330,000 +45 .7

736,000 + 22 Oysters, Pacific, shucked

35,000
-19 +59

116,000 *Halibut and shark fleets and receipts from local and all other sources.

6,942,000 4,506,000 5,046,000 16,895,000 10,093,000

288,000

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BAD WEATHER HITS SHRIMP PRODUCTION IN GULF

Shrimp production through March was severely hampered by unusually bad weather this year, according to the Service's New Orleans Market News office. Hard crab production increased greatly because a number of shrimp plants turned to crab picking in season to fill in during slack shrimp production.

Both canned and fresh oyster dealers report that labor shortages have caused production to remain below the levels of the same period in 1943.

Item

Production of Fishery Products in the Gulf States*

March 1944

3 months Unit March

compared with Jan,-Mar, 1944 Feb. 1944. Mar. 1943 1944

Percent Percent

Compared with 12 months 3 months Jan. -Dec. 1943

1943 Percent

Shrimp:

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138,874 251,394 390,268

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18

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For canning
Bbls.

728

93 Other

7.945
-24 + 62 30,152

+ 33
Total
7,945 -24 + 48 30,885

8 Oysters: For canning

120,482 +43

16

222,423 37 Other 32,902

94.397 - 22 To tal

153,384 +31

- 16
316,820

- 34
Hard crabs
Lbs. 349,490 +11

+185
744,108

+120 Crab meat, fresh-cooked

31,850 -20

+167 79,153 +123 Salt-water fish M 466,650 + 4

4 1,381,051 - 6 Fresh-water fish

88.469 +47

+ 49 169,809 + 53 Includes production in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. **85 barrels canned during February 1944.

***445 barrels canned during March 1943.

507,350 298,641

805,991 8,876,943 1,028,908 6,683,995

662,525

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AMENDMENT 30 TO MPR-418 EFFECTIVE APRIL 17

Ceiling prices for fresh yellowtails and blackbacks, formerly based on size differentials, were changed April 1l by the establishment of single per pound ceilings for all sizes of these fish, the OPA announced in issuing Amendment 30 to Maximum Price Regulation 418Fresh Fish and Seafood. This action, effective April 17, 1944, Covers producers and all types of wholesalers handling fresh yellowtails, blackbacks and sea dabs and reduces the margin between the buying and selling prices of primary fish shipper-wholesalers handling these species from two cents to one cent. The primary fish shipper-wholesaler's price for sea dabs is now 50 cents per pound round from April through September and 7 cents per pound from October through March.

However, in sales of fresh blackback, round, during the winter season (now changed to cover the period from December 1 through March, where the period formerly was from October through March) the primary fish shipper-wholesaler's margin is changed from 2 cents to iz cents per pound.

Prices for these items to the consuming public will be reduced by approximately one cent per pound under current prices.

The action also establishes ceiling prices for sales by producers and wholesalers of rajafish (skates) in three styles of dressings. The rajafish is a member of the ray fish family.

Fillet prices for the blackbacks, sea dabs and yellowtails are fixed at the lower yellowtail prices inasmuch as all three species are indistinguishable in fillet form and yellowtails form the bulk of the fillets. These prices at the primary fish shipper level are fixed at 242 cents per pound. Also, lemon sole and gray sole fillets ceiling prices will take yellowtail fillet prices unless these items are wrapped and marked either as lemon sole or gray sole. Other pricing measures included in the amendment are:

(1) The definition of a sale by a service and delivery wholesaler is changed to read that the delivery must be made to the individual retail store or the established place of doing business of the purveyor of meals. Prior to this change the definition of a sale by a service and delivery wholesaler provided that the fish or seafood must be delivered frolu the wholesaler's established place of doing business to the retailer's or purveyor's usual receiving point by means other than a common carrier.

There was considerable doubt as, to the meaning of "usual receiving point." In some instances, wholesalers selling to out-of-town retailers would deliver the boxed fish or seafood to the local station for freight shipment and declare the station to be the customer's usual receiving point, thereby entitling the seller to Table E prices in the wholesale fresh fish regulation. Such practice was contrary to the intent of the regulation.

(2) The definition of a sale by a cash and carry wholesaler is changed to mean any sale by a person to an individual retail store or purveyor of meals other than a service and delivery sale. This changed definition will plug any possible loopholes whereby cash and carry sales are being priced as service and delivery sales.

(3) It adds an additional provision to the invoice section of the regulation in the way of a penalty price if the seller fails to note on the statement furnished the purchaser that the fish or seafood is fresh. This will provide enforcement agents with a more effective means of enforcing the invoice and record requirements of the regulation.

Excerpts follow:

fresh fish and seafood involved in the 4. In section 18, after the definition o: sale is the maximum price for the lowest, { "Round" the following definition is inpriced size, grade and style of dressing serted: of the species of fresh fish and seafood sold. If the seller fails to note on the "Saddles” means the pectoral fins and statement that the fish or seafood is fresh, the connecting cartilaginous strip of a and if a price is listed in Maximum Price rajafish. Regulation No. 364 for the species in the particular style of dressing or processing

5. In section 18, after the definition of sold, the maximum price which may be “Troll caught” the following definition charged for the fish or seafood involved is inserted: in the sale is the lower of the prices

"Wings” means the pectoral fins of a listed in Maximum Price Regulation No.

rajafish. 364 and this Maximum Price Regulation No. 418: Provided, That this paragraph, 6. In section 20, Table A, Schedule shall not apply to any sales made at Nos. 4 and 6 are amended and Schedule prices listed in Table A in section 20. No. 65 is added to read as follows:

TABLE A-MAXIMUM PRICES FOR PRODUCERS or Fresh FISH AND SEAFOOD

1. Section 4 (b) is amended to read as follows:

(b) Sale by a cash and carry wholesaler. A sale by a cash and carry wholesaler is any sale by a person to an individual retail store or purveyor of meals other than a service and delivery sale as defined in section 4 (c).

2. Section 4 (c) is amended to read as follows:

(c) Sale by a service and delivery wholesaler. A sale by a service and delivery wholesaler is a sale of fresh fish or seafood to a retailer or purveyor of meals, which fish or seafood is delivered by means other than a common carrier from the seller's estab ished place of doing business to the individual retail store or established place of doing business of the purveyor of meals.

3. Section 13 (c) is amended to read as follows:

(c) Every person making a sale of any fresh fish or seafood subject to this regulation shall furnish to the purchaser at the time of delivery a written statement setting forth the date; the name and address of the buyer and seller; the species sold; a notation that the fish or seafood is fresh; the quantity, sizes, grades and styles of dressing of fresh fish and seafood, and the price charged therefor, including a separate statement of the container cost, if any, as provided in section 19, and transportation cost, if any, as provided in section 7. If the statement furnished a purchaser at the time of delivery does not identify the size, grade and style of dressing, the maxi, mum price which may be charged for the

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Rajafish (Skates) (Genus

1 Round.. 2 Saddles 3 Wings

All sizes. All sizes. All sizes.

Jan. through Dec. Bulk er-ressel Bored $0.01 .0242

raja).

$0.0342 .0342

.0442

7. In section 20, Table B, the refer- ence to footnote 37 is added to Item ence to footnote 37 is added to Item No. 2 of Schedule No. 14. No. 2 of Schedule No. 13.

8. In section 20, Table B, the refer

9, 11, 13, and 15. In section 20, Tables B, C, D, and E, Schedule Nos, 4, 5, and 6 are amended and Schedule No. 65 is added to read as follows:

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