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FEBRUARY RECEIPTS AT SEATTLE SHOW 28 PERCENT GAIN

With the help of large arrivals of frozen halibut and silver salmon from Alaska, Seattle's receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products in February exceeded those of January and of February 1943, according to the Service's Fishery Market News office in Seattle. The gain over January was 28 percent, while that over February 1943 was 92 percent.

Receipts totaled 4,916,000 pounds, making the figure for the first two months of 1944, 32 percent larger than that for the similar period in 1943. The most important item received was halibut, while silver salmon, lingcod, and Pacific oysters followed in order.

Jan. -Dec. 12 months

1943 Pounds 82,505,000

+ 92

Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Seattle

February 1944 2 mos. 2 mos. 1944 I tem

February

compared with Jan-Feb compared

1944 Jan. 1944 Feb.1945 1944 2 mos. 1943 Classification:

Pounds
Per cent Percent

Pounds Per cent
To tal fish and shellfish
4,916,000 + 28

8,768,000 + 32
Important Items:
Halibut

1,272,000 . 12
+539 2,724,000

+ 52
Lingcod
423,000 +202 + 5

563,000 Rockfish

243,000 + 70

+ 15

387,000 + 6 Salmon, chum 126,000 . 46 + 83 361,000

+ 32 Salmon, silver

725,000 +106 +867 1,077,000 +133 Shark, soupfin

186,000 . 1

69

373,000 - 49 Livers, dogfish

129,000 + 18

+174

238,000 Oysters, Pacific, shucked

377.,000 + 17

+162

700,000 +149 *Halibut and shark fleets and receipts from local and all other sources.

11

24,383,000 5,958,000 4,483,000 3,163,000 4,772,000 1,559,000 2,246,000 2,486,000

- 90

FEBRUARY PRODUCTION IN GULF BELOW 1943

Labor shortages, both on the vessels and for shore operations, and inclement weather affected the production of fishery products in the Gulf area for the month of February, according to the Service's Fishery Market News office at New Orleans. Production of both shrimp and oysters, the two most important items, and salt-water fish, fell considerably below February 1943 totals. Compared with January, production increased in general, attributable to inactivity of the fishing fleet in Mississippi during the entire month of January.

The high prices being paid for crabmeat on the eastern markets greatly increased the production of hard crabs and crabmeat over February 1943. Oyster canning increased during the month. A considerable number of the plants canning oysters are now operating under Federal Food and Drug Inspection Service.

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19

Production of Fishery Products in the Gulf States
February 1944

2 months
Item
Unit February compared with

Jan-Feb.
1944
Jan. 1944 Feb. 1943

1944

Percent Percent
Shrimp:
For canning

Bbls.
85 - 87

- 98

728 Other

10,414

12
-3

22,212 Total

10,499

16
- 31

22,940
Oysters:
For canning
84,046 +370 - 37

101,941 Other

33,032 + 16

- 17

61,495 Total

117,078 +153 - 32 163,436 Hard crabs

Lbs.
313,908 +289 +170

394,618 Crab meat, fresh-cooked

40,023 +450

+210

47,303 Sal t-water fish

450,080 3

25

914,401 Fresh-water fish

81,340 "Includes production in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.

60,270 +186 + 58

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AMENDMENT 26 TO MPR-418 EFFECTIVE MARCH 13

Price limitations have been established on sales of fresh fish and seafood not under specific ceilings when they are sold by fishermen and wholesalers in combination with varieties for which maximum prices have been fixed, the Office of Price Administration announced March 7. These limitations, listed in Amdt. 26 to MPR-418 which became effective March 13, include:

1. A ceiling of the current market price or 5 cents a pound (whichever is less) on sales or pur

chases of hitherto uncontrolled fish or seafood, by or from producers, if at least 25 per cent of the weight of the total fish or seafood involved in the sale is under price control.

2. A ceiling of the current market price for sales or purchases by or from wholesalers of hitherto

uncontrolled fish when sold in combination with controlled fish,

3. A prohibition against the offering, selling, or delivering of fresh fish or seafood on condition

that the purchaser is required to purchase some other commodity or service.

4. A prohibition against falsely or incorrectly invoicing fresh fish or seafood.

The action was taken because of many cases called to OPA's attention where fantastic and exorbitant prices were paid suppliers of fresh fish and seafood on which there was no control to ensure to the purchaser supplies of varieties for which ceiling prices are fixed. There was an instance in which a wholesaler had to pay as high as $500 for one fish (a skate) to obtain an entire boatload of a type of fish under price control. In several other instances, a few pounds of uncontrolled fish were auctioned off to wholesalers from a boatload of fish otherwise under ceilings with the unstated consideration that the highest bidder got the entire boatload at ceiling prices after being the high bidder for the few pounds of non-ceiling fish. The action should strengthen OPA's efforts to keep fish prices in line at all levels, including retail, OPA said.

OPA has pursued the policy of regulating the major species of fish and seafood first, and plans to extend price control to other and minor species as the necessary data on these items are collected and analyzed. Until this is done, OPA believes it is necessary to separate the market activities with respect to uncontrolled fish from those of controlled fish so that the former do not impede effective price control. Excerpts from Amdt. 26 follow:

Section 14 is amended to read as follows:

SEC. 14. Evasion. (a) The price limitations set forth in this Regulation shall not be evaded, either by direct or indirect methods, in connection with an offer, solicitation, agreement, sale, delivery, purchase or receipt of, or relating to fresh fish or seafood separately or in combination with any other commodity or service, or by way of any commission, service, transportation, container, packaging or other charge, or discount premium or other privilege, or by tying agreement or other trade understanding, or by changing the style of dressing of fresh fish or seafood, or otherwise.

(b) Specifically, but not exclusively, the following practices are prohibited:

(1) Falsely or incorrectly invoicing fresh fish and seafood.

(2) Offering, selling or delivering fresh fish or seafood on condition that the purchaser is required to purchase some other commodity or service.

(3) Offering to sell or purchase, selling or purchasing, delivering or receiving at a price higher than the current market price, not to exceed 5 cents per pound, any fresh fish or seafood not priced by this Maximum Price Regulation No. 418 when sold by or purchased from a producer in combination with a sale or purchase of fresh fish or seafood, the price of which is controlled by Maximum Price Regulation No. 418; Provided, That this subparagraph (3) shall not apply if fresh fish or seafood, the price of which is controlled by Maximum Price Regula

tion No. 418, constitutes less than 25 percent of the weight of the fresh fish or seafood involved in the total sale or purchase.

(4) Offering to sell or purchase, selling or purchasing, delivering or receiving at a price higher than the current market price any fresh fish or seafood not priced by this Maximum Price Regulation No. 418 when sold by or purchased from a wholesaler in combination with a sale or purchase of fresh fish or seafood, the price of which is controlled by Maximum Price Regulation No. 418.

(5) Charging, paying, billing or receiving any consideration for or in connection with any service for which a specific allowance has not been provided in this Maximum Price Regulation No. 418.

AMENDMENT 27 TO MPR-418 EFFECTIVE MARCH 18

Maximum prices for sales of fresh ocean pouts (also commonly known as conger eels or eelpouts) for producers and wholesalers were announced by the office of Price Administration, March 20. This action, taken through issuance of Amdt. 27 to MPR-418, effective March 18, was found to be necessary because producers were using this previously uncontrolled item to evade ceiling prices on boatloads of controlled fish. Exorbitant prices were paid fishermen for this fish in order to secure for buyers supplies of ceiling priced fish. cases, this was as high as $3 per pound off the boat.

Under Amdt: 26 to the fish regulation a cover-all provision fixed a ceiling of 5 cents per pound for all uncontrolled species when sold in combination with controlled varieties

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of fish, The 5-cent cover-all is far above the 1942 average for sales of ocean pout by producers. The new wholesale prices represent a reduction of 2 cents per pound round below present going prices.

Excerpts follow:

Maximum Price Regulation No. 418 is amended in the following respects:
1. Schedule No. 64 is added to Table A in section 20 to read as follows:

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2, 3, 4, and 5. Schedule No. 64 is added to Tables B, C, D, and E in section 20 to read as

follows:

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Style

Price per pound Sched, Species

Item of

Size Months TABLE* No.

No. dressing

B c | D 64 Ocean pout (Conger eel or eelpout Zoarces 1 Round All Jan-Dec 4 5

8

6 anguillaris, Leptocephalus conger

2 Fillets

18 19 20 23
TABLE B-MAXIMUM PRICES FOR PRIMARY FISH SHIPPER SALES
TABLE C--MAXIMUM PRICES FOR RETAILER-OWNED COOPERATIVE SALES AND SALES BY WHOLESALERS OTHER HAN PRIMARY

FISH SHIPPER WHOLESALERS TO OTHER WHOLESALERS
TABLE D-MAXIMUM PRICES FOR CASH AND CARRY SALES
TABLE E--MAXIMUM PRICES FOR SERVICE AND DELIVERY SALES

AMENDMENT 28 TO MPR-418 SETS CANADIAN LAKE FISH PRICES

A new schedule of American importers' maximum prices for Canadian fresh lake fish was issued March 29 by the Office of Price Administration, which at the same time fixed prices which the importers can pay in Canada for these items. As a result of this action, effective April 3, 1944, the prices of some Canadian fresh lake fish items should be substantially reduced in retail sales to the American consuming public. The new schedule reflects the

. prevailing ceiling prices plus the average transportation costs from any of Canada's interior lakes to Winnipeg, traditionally the central gathering point for all Canadian lake

, fish.

The action, basing fillet prices in the United States on the cost of the round fish in Canada, accomplishes a reduction in the wholesale price of sauger fillets from 32 cents to 27 cents a pound, and on yellow pike fillets from 43 cents to 34 cents a pound. The adjustment in transportation costs effects slight decreases for other fish items. Prices are established for the first time on Canadian suckers and tullibees and fillets of whitefish, lake trout and pickerel.

To the ceiling prices the importer may add duty paid at the border and list actual cost of transportation but not to exceed the carload-rail rate from Winnipeg to receiving point.

Under the original regulation the method of determining transportation costs in Canada proved unsatisfactory since it resulted in a wide variety of prices in any American consuming center, each of which may have received fish bought by importers from Canadian wholesalers located at different interior lakes. Thus, it proved difficult to check either transportation costs from remote lakes, where fresh fish was moved by truck or sledge, or whether the importer bought from a Canadian wholesaler or. producer.

Together with the issuance of the new price schedule, OPA clarified domestic transportation allowances which may be added to maximum prices for any fish or seafood. Any domestic wholesaler buying from another domestic wholesaler may add his actual transportation costs, not exceeding the common carrier rates and excluding local trucking, hauling and handling charges. In order to add such transportation costs, the wholesaler must separately record them on the invoice given to the customer purchasing the fish or seafood. Each addi

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tional purchasing wholesaler may in turn pass on such transportation costs, only if they, in turn, add them on to the invoice to their customers.

No transportation allowance may be added either by a producer or a primary fish shipperwholesaler except when the latter ships fish from his principal place of business to a branch warehouse located in an area remote from the source of supply.

The OPA also modified the transportation costs which may be added by an importer of fresh fish or seafood other than Canadian lake fish. Now, the importer or agent of a foreign consignor determines the transportation allowance he may add by reference to three methods.

The first is the actual transportation cost to his receiving point from the foreign shipping point. The second is the transportation cost to his receiving point from the point at which the fish or seafood enters the United States. However, in using this base the importer may take the transportation cost from the domestic shipping point closest to the foreign seller's shipping point rather than from the actual point at which the fish or seafood enters the United States.

The third is the transportation cost from the domestic port producing the greatest volume of that fish to the importer's receiving point. The importer determines the transportation allowance he may add by taking the lowest of these three alternatives.

Thus, where a Boston concern imports a carload of haddock from Canada, it cannot add any transportation in selling that imported fish since more haddock is landed in Boston than in any other port. A Detroit concern importing from Halifax, Nova Scotia, a carload of haddock which enters the United States near Windsor would not be restricted to the transportation cost from the point at which the fish enters the United States. It would take either the cost of transportation from the shipping point in America closest to Halifax (some point in Maine) or the cost of transportation from Boston, whichever is less.

However, OPА points out, if the actual through transportation cost from Halifax to Detroit were less than either of these alternatives, that would be used.

A wholesaler buying from an importer would pass on this transportation allowance and would himself add transportation in the same manner as would any other wholesaler buying from a wholesaler.

This action was taken to avoid ceiling prices for imported fish that would be higher than ceiling prices for domestic fish of the same species because of transportation differentials. Imported fish normally sells in competition with domestic fish of the same kind at about the same price.

The amendment also provides definitions for steaks, center cuts, head cuts, and tail cuts. The definition of dressed fish is amended to include any portion of the dressed fish not otherwise designated. Such portions of dressed fish not specifically provided for will be priced at the dressed price.

Excerpts from Amendment 28 to Maximum Price Regulation 418--Fresh Fish and Seafood effective April 3, 1944, follow:

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Maximum Price Regulation No. 418 is amended in the following respects:

1. Section 7 (a) preceding the example is amended to read as follows:

(a) When a wholesaler may add his transportation cost to the listed prices. Any wholesaler in the United States buying fresh fish or seafood from another wholesaler in the United States may add to the price fixed in section 20 for such fish or seafood his actual transportation cost (excluding local trucking, hauling and handling charges) from the seller's shipping point to such wholesaler's receiving point, but only when he records the transportation cost in an invoice to the customer purchasing the fish or seafood. A purchasing wholesaler or subse

quent wholesalers of that fish or seafood the purpose of transportation allowance
may pass on such transportation cost as be considered a wholesaler who purchases
part of the maximum selling price, but fish and seafood from another whole-
only if they in turn record it on an in- saler.
voice to their customers. In no case

2. Section 7 (b), (c) and (d) are inmay the added transportation cost ex

serted preceding the example to read as ceed the common carrier rate from the

follows: shipping point to the wholesaler's receiying point. Where a wholesaler has a (b) Service and delivery sales. When branch warehouse located at a remote a service and delivery wholesaler delivers point from his principal place of busi- by means other than a common carrier ness as well as at a remote point from the to an individual retail store or purveyor nearest domestic port producing the of meals located at a distance of more greatest volume of a particular species than 25 air miles from the point of shipand such wholesaler ships fresh fish or ment, he may add to his maximum price seafood of such species from his principal the appropriate charge listed below. place of business to the branch warehouse, such branch warehouse may for

(b) Except as hereinafter provided no person in the course of trade or business shall import (buy, receive or in any manner pay for and bring in, deliver or cause to be brought into or delivered into the continental United States) from Canada any of the species of Canadian lake fish listed below at a price higher than the price established in the table below for such species of Canadian lake fish. The table prices below are f. o. b. the City of Winnipeg in the Province of Manitoba, Canada, and apply to all Canadian lake fish imported from Winnipeg. The max

imum importing price for Canadian lake fish which is imported from any point in Canada, other than Winnipeg, shall be an 1. o. b. price in line with the f. o. b. Winnipeg price so that the total cost of the fish delivered to the importer's place of business is not greater than it would have been if purchased f. o. b. at Winnipeg. These maximum prices are in American currency and apply to such fish caught or landed in Canada except fish caught in Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Ontario or Lake Erie.

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1. Whitefish-Canadian (Coregonus clupei

formis). 2. Tullibee--Canadian (Argyrosomus tullibee)

or (Leucichthys tullibee). 3. Lake Trout-Canadian (Cristivomer mamay

cush). 4. Yellow Pike-Canadian (Yellows or Wall

eyed Pike) (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) 5. Sucker-Canadian (Fresh water Mullet)

(Catostomidae species). 8. Pickerel-Canadian (Jacks, Great Northern

Pike or Grass Pike) (Esox lucius). 7. Sauger-Canadian (Sand Pike) (Stizostedion

canadense). 8. Yellow Perch-Canadian (Perca flavescens).

1 Round or gutted. 2 Round or gutted. 1 Round. 2 Gutted.. 1 Round or gutted... 1 Round or gutted.. 2 Headless and gutted. 3 Fillets..

Round. 2 Fillets.. 1 Round. 2 Headless and gutted. 3 Fillets... 1 Round. 2 Headless and gutted. 3 Fillets.. 1

Round.

. 12 . 15 .30% .03 . 14 .05%

...do.

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do.

.074 . 16%

.09 .11% 24 10%

Allowance in cents Distance:

per pound 26 to 75 miles.

142 76 to 150 miles..

34 151 to 250 miles.-

1 Over 250 miles.--.

144 (c) Transportation allowance for imported fish. Any importer or agent of a foreign consignor of fresh fish or seafood may add as a transportation allowance to the appropriate table price the lowest amount determined on the following three bases:

(1) The actual cost of transportation (exclusive of local trucking hauling and handling charges) from the seller's shipping point to the importer's receiving point;

(2) The actual cost of transportation (exclusive of local trucking, hauling and handling charges) to the importer's receiving point from the point at which the fresh fish or seafood entered the United States or the carload rail rate for fresh fish or seafood from the point in the United States nearest the foreign shipper's shipping point whichever is designated by the seller.

(3) The actual cost of transportation (exclusive of local trucking, hauling and handling charges) to the importer's receiving point from the nearest domestic port where the greatest volume of that species is landed.

In determining the transportation allowance common carrier rates shall be used, and the importer may add the allowance only when he records it on an invoice to the customer purchasing the fish or seafood designating which of the three bases he is using. A purchasing wholesaler or subsequent wholesalers of that fish or seafood may pass on such transportation allowance, but only if they in turn record it in an invoice to their customers. This paragraph (c) does not apply to Canadian lake fish listed in Schedules 51-60.

(d) Canadian loke fish. . Any importer or agent of a foreign consignor of fish Povered in Schedules 51-60 inclusive may add the actual transportation cost (excluding local trucking, hauling and handling charges) from the point of shipment to the receiving point in the United States, but in no event more than carload rail rate from the City of Winnipeg in the Province of Manitoba, Canada, to such receiving point. He may add such transportation cost only if he records it on an invoice to the customer purchasing the fish or seafood. A purchasing wholesaler or subsequent wholesalers of such fish or seafood may pass on such transportation cost, but only if they in turn record it in an invoice to their customers.

3. The designation of section 7 (b) following the example is changed to read 7 (e).

4. Section 8 is amended to read as follows:

SEC. 8. Imported fresh fish and seafood. (a) The maximum prices at which a wholesaler, including any agent of a foreign shipper, may sell any fresh fish and seafood listed in the regulation shall be the prices listed in Table B, C, D, or E, depending on the type of sale involved, plus the container prices provided in section 19 when containers are used, plus transportation as provided in section 7. The provisions of this paragraph are modified in the case of Canadian lake fish by the footnotes 32 and 33 applicable to Schedules 51-60.

5. Section 11 (b) is deleted.

have been removed which does not ex6. In section 18 after the definition of

ceed in thickness its largest diameter or "Cellophane wrapped" the following 4 inches, whichever is smaller. definition is inserted:

10. In section 18 after the definition of "Center cut” or “Cut-center" means "Steak" the following definition is ina cross section cut (not & head cut or serted: tail cut) from the middle portion of and “Tail cut” or “Cut-tail" means a cross not exceeding 13 the length of the section cut from the tail end of the dressed fish.

dressed fish. 7. In section 18 the definition of

11. In section 20, Table B is amended “Dressed" is amended to read as follows:

by deleting Schedule No. 58 and amend“Dressed” means fish from which the

ing Schedules Nos. 51 to 57 inclusive and head and viscera have been removed or any portion of such fish not otherwise

Schedules Nos. 59 and 60 to read as foldesignated.

lows: 8. In section 18 after the definition of 12. Footnote 21 following Table B in "Gutted" the following definition is in section 20 is amended to read as follows: serted:

21 These prices apply to this species caught "Head cut” or “Cut-heau" ineans a or landed in Canada except that they do not cross section cut from the head end of apply to fish caught in Lake Superior, Lake the dressed fish.

Huron, Lake Ontario or Lake Erie. 9. In section 18 after the definition of 13. Footnote 22 following Table B in "Seine caught” the following definition section 20 is amended to read as follows: is inserted:

* To these prices may be added duty. Any "Steak” or “Slice" means a cross sec- person who processes this species in a fresh tion cut from the dressed ash after the state may add to his selling price the amount tail, fins and collar bone (nape bone)

which will recover the full amount of the
duty which he paid for the particular lot of

dish involved in the processing.
TABLE B.-MAXIMUM PRICES FOR PRIMARY FISH SHIPPER SALES OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD

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31 Whitefish-Canadian (Coregonus clupei

formis) 21 32 33 52 Tullibee-Canadian (Argyrosomus tulli

bee) or (Leucichthys tullibee) 21 32 33 53 | Lake Trout-Canadian (Cristivomer

mamaycush) 21 22 35 -54 | Yellow Pike-Canadian (Yellows or

Wall-eyed Pike) (Stizostedion vit

reum vitreum).11 22 33 35 Sucker-Canadian (Fresh water Mullet)

(Catostomidae species).21 32 33 57 Pickerel-Canadian (Jacks, Great

Northern Pike or Grass Pike) (Esox

Round or gutted. 2

Round or gutted.

Fillets.. 1 Round 2 Gutted. 1 Round or gutted.

Fillets. 1

Round or gutted. 2 Headless and gutted. 3 Fillets.

Round. 2 Fillets. 1 Round 2 Headless and gutted. 3 Fillets. 1 Round. 2 Headless and gutted. 3 Fillets... 1 Round.

...do. ..do. ..do. ..do. ..do.

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$0.18%

.2244 .3543 .07442 .08% . 1941 .37 .14% .17%

34 04%

16% 07 09% 18% 11 14 .27 13

do

lucius).11 32 33 59 Sauger--Canadian (Sand Pike) (8tizos

tedion canadense). 31 32 33 60 Yellow Perch-Canadian (Perca flaves

cens). 21 21 35

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