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1,052

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Boston, Mass.

Jopt.

14,988 12,989 14,985 Gloucester, Mass.

21,904 23,696 24,259
Portland, Maino

do
1,772
1,707

2,053
Boston, Gloucostor, and Portland:
Cod .....

do
3,447
2,516

3,685
Haddock

do
9,622
8,952

8,708
Pollock

812
558

441
Rosefish

11,883 14,533 15,134
FISH RECEIPTS, CHICAGO1/
Salt-water fish ..

do
2,170
2,505

2,069
Prosh-wator fish

do
2,864
3,289

2,788
Shellfish, etc. ...

do
1,015
1,213

609
By truck

1,052

1,322
By express

2,751
3,217

3,144
By freight

do
2,246
2,467

1,270
COLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS2)
Now York, N. Y.:
Salt-wator fish

11,852

7,325 11,169
fresh-water fish

do
1,206
1,921

1,265
Shollfish, otc.

do
1,813
1,590

953
Boston, Mass.:
Salt-water fish

17,381 12,201 17,258
Frosh-wator fish

do
64
34

56
Shellfisk, etc.

do
839
1,576

896
Chicago, Ill.:
Salt-water fish

do
2,973
3,247

2,790
Fresh-water fish

do
3,804
1,442

4,024
Shellfish, otc.

do
683
635

322
United States:
cod fillots ...

Oct. 6,558

2,269

6,745
Haddock fillots

do
5,280
3,268

4,892
Halibut ....

do 17,087 12,762 17,629 Mackerel (ozcopt Spanish)

do 11,852

7,982 11,882
Croakers ...

do
2,622
2,464

2,734
Rosofish fillots

4,057
3,990

3,898
Salmon

do 11,174

8,727

8,856 Whiting

do 10,587 10,607

9,410
Shrimp ...

do
4,925
4,163

2,063
New England, all species ...

do 31,757 23,592 31,904
Middle Atlantic, all spacios ...

28,427
20, 429

26,684
South Atlantic, all spocios ..

do
6,802
5,546

5,630
North Central East, all species

do 15,088 12,302 14,582
North Central Wost, all spocios

4,310
3,565

4,306
South Central, all spocios

5,796
3,932

4,377
Pacific, all species ...

do 39,437 28,859

36, 215
1 Includes all arrivals as reported by express and rail terminals, and truck receipts as

reported by wholesale dealers including smokers.
2/ Data for individual cities are as of the last Thursday of the month, except those for

Boston which are for the last Wednesday of the month. Data on United States holdings
by various specios and by geographical areas are as of the first of the month.

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FISHERY MARKET NEWS

DECEMBER 1944

CONTENTS

11

Page RECEIPTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS AT SEATTLE, 1943, by E. C. Hinsdale

2 Record supply of fish forecast by OOF

10 Pilchard catch boosts U. S. production ...........

10 Interior Department institutes closed season for sablefish

11 U, S. halibut vessels granted privileges in Canada ....... Surplus diesel engines and boats listed by Maritime Commission .................

12 Production of non-commercial fishing tackle still restricted

12 ODT penalty demarrage charges suspended

13 FRESH FISH TRADE October landings at three ports greater than in 1943 ...

13 Ten-month to tal of New Bedford landings 23 percent above 1943

14 Favorable weather stimulates shrimp production in October

15 October New York receipts increase il percent over September ........

16 October receipts at Chicago show a decrease of 1 percent from September ...... 16 October receipts at Seattle show 68 percent gain ........

17 FROZEN FISH TRADE U. s. holdings on November 1 32 percent greater than year previous

18 October freezings by U. S. cold-storage plants 26 percent larger than October 1943 . 18 New York cold-storage holdings continue upward trend in October

19 Boston cold-storage holdings show little change in October

19 Chicago cold-storage holdings of October 26 show slight decrease

20 Canadian holdings on November 1 16 percent greater than those of one year earlier 20 Canadian freezings decline during October

21 And t, 25 to MPR-364 effective November 25

21 CANNED AND CURED FISH TRADE Final Alaska salmon pack to tals 4,856,330 cases ..........

22 Tuna and mackerel ten-month packs show large increases over 1943

22 Increased pilchard pack follows rise in catch

23 October shrimp pack exceeds October 1943 by 25,500 cases

23 Regulation governing fill of oyster containers issued

24 Point values for canned fish

24 BYPRODUCTS TRADE Use of bags for fish meal restricted

24 FOREIGN FISHERY TRADE Whitefish inspection in Canada begun in November

24 Import control of fishery products shifted to WA ..........

25
New import forms required by WFA
STATISTICAL SUMMARIES
WFA purchases $12,218,000 in fishery products in October

26 Wholesale and retail prices

26 Trends of fishery trade .

Inside back cover Fishery trade indicators

Outside back cover Index to Volume 6, Nos, 1 to 12, inclusive, 1944

28 Contents continued on page 27

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DÉPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

IRA N. GABRIELSON, Director

THE

WILDLIFE

TMENTS

FISHERY MARKET NEWS

AND

FISH

SERVICE

A REVIEW OF CONDITIONS AND TRENDS OF THE FISHERY INDUSTRIES
PREPARED IN THE DIVISION OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

A. W. Anderson, Editor

C. R. Lucas, Associate Editor
J. M. Lemon - TECHNOLOGY

W. H. Dumont MARKET NEWS
E. A. Power
. STATISTICS

R. A. Kahn

ECONOMICS
L. S. Christey -

MARKET DEVELOPMENT
Applications for FISHERY MARKET NEWS, which is mailed free to members of the fishery industry and allied interests, should be addressed

to the Director, Fish and Rildlife Service, United States Department of the Interior, Washington 25, D. C.

The Service assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of material from outside sources.

December 1944

Washington 25, D. C.

Vol. 6, No. 12

RECEIPTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS AT SEATTLE, 1943

By E. C. Hinsdale*

During 1943, the receipts of fresh and frozen fish, shellfish, and grayfish (dogfish) and soupfin shark livers at Seattle totaled 80,909,000 pounds, an increase of over 10ž million pounds, or 15 percent, above the 1942 figure of 70,257,000 pounds. Making up the year's total were the local landings and shipments reported by the halibut and salmon exchanges, direct local receipts by wholesalers, coastwise vessel arrivals from Alaska, imports from British Columbia, and other shipments from non-local sources.

Halibut led all other varieties with a total of 24,384,000 pounds, or 30 percent, of all receipts. Following in order were: salmon, 16,922,000 pounds, or 21 percent; flounders (sole), 10,295,000 pounds, or 13 percent; lingcod, 6,942,000 pounds, or 8 percent; sablefish, 5,046,000 pounds, or 6 percent; and rockfishes, 4,506,000 pounds, or 5 percent. Pacific oyster receipts were 2,486,000 pounds, only 3 percent of all receipts, but 53 percent of the shellfish total. Crabs followed with 1,448,000 pounds of meats, representing 2 percent of all receipts and 30 percent of those of shellfish.

Heavier production by the otter-trawl fleet increased turbot receipts about 2-3/4 million pounds over 1942, but the total volume of other flounders (sole) was approximately on the same level as the previous year. Fresh lingcod receipts rose over 1 million pounds, or 19 percent; while fresh rockfishes, including sea bass, rock cod, and similar species, gained 163 percent.

In 1943, receipts of chinook salmon dropped over 1-3/4 million pounds, or 22 percent, falling from 8,130,000 pounds received in 1942 to 6,349,000 pounds. Sockeye salmon receipts of 26,698 pounds were practically negligible in comparison to the abnormal total of 1,321,000 pounds the previous year. Although 1943 was classed as a good pink salmon year, receipts were not heavy at Seattle, the bulk of the catch going to canneries at other Puget Sound points. The 1943 pink salmon total, 538,000 pounds, cannot be compared to the 1942 receipts of only 1,547 pounds because pink salmon runs are negligible in even-numbered years, The comparable 1941 total was 896,000 pounds. The chum or fall salmon total of 2,768,000 pounds was 55 percent less than the 6,134,024 pounds received in 1942. Receipts of silver salmon also failed to measure up to the preceding year'ş total of 3,042,000 pounds, being nearly half a million pounds less.

The most notable decline was in the landings of the United States halibut fleet. Receipts were nearly 1-3/4 million pounds less than those received in 1942, which, in turn, were over 4 million pounds less than the 1941 total. Until July 13, 1943, when ceiling prices were put into effect, the halibut season progressed normally, with indications that it would compare very favorably with 1941. As a direct result of the ceiling prices, halibut fares from Area III, the only fishing area open at the time, dropped to the lowest figure ever reached for Seattle. The halibut vessels practically stopped landing at Seattle and de'Fishery Marketing Specialist.

20

1,600

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TABLE I - Volume and Source of Total Receipts, By Species, 1943 and 1942
1943

1943 Varie ty

compared
Variety

compared
1943
with

1942
and

1943 and

1942

with Source

1942
Source

1942
FISH
Pounds Percent Pounds

FISH Cont'd.) Pounds Percent Pounds Carp, local 9,213

Salmon Continued): Catfish, local 174.927

Pink: Cod, true:

Local

537,823
+

1,547 Local

609,151

23
786,545
Frozen, other

8.951
Frozen, other
17,870
To tal fresh & frozen 546,7727

1,547 Total fresh & frozen 627,021

786,545

Silver or coho:

Local Dolly Varden trout:

2,445, 246 20 3,041,473 Other

Other
20
1.282

80

1.300 +1525
8.300
Frozen, other

75 33, 766
To tal fresh

2,446,546 20 3,041,553 Total fresh & frozen

26 3:12 332 9,900

Frozen, other 72

2.324,122

35,048 Flounders:

To tel fresh & frozen 4.770,660 23 6,166,250 Sole, English, local 1,775,831

Sockeye or blue back,
local

26,698
5,191, 783
Petrale,

98 | 1,321, 117 Sand & Dover,

Unclassified,
local
14, 251

frozen, other 1,277.493 + 9 1,170, 742 Turbot, 3,102, 215 + 918 304,507

Grand total fresh 12,128,239 35 18,627,820 Flounder,

199,699
17.407,260*

frozen 4.793,572 85.203.941 Total local 10,283,779 + 33 7,711, 767

fresh &

16,921,811 29 23,831,761 Sole, other

frozen To tal fresh 10, 292, 258 + 34 7,711,767 Shad, other

225,952 Flounder, frozen,

Skate wings, local

21,613
other
3.175

Smelt:
To tal fresh & frozen 10, 295,433 + + 34 17,711,767 Eulachon:
Haddock, frozen, other 41,450

Local

+ 37,45

Other
Halibut:
No.1-Exchange, local 6,931,725 107,726,550

Total fresh

577.470 +1442 37.450 No. 25,514,754 176,649,530 Silver, local

198,326 17 239,720 Unclassified

583,485 + 77 329.374 Soupfin shark: Sub-total 13,029,964 11 14.705,454

Local

1,573,165 + 817 171,615 Unclassified, other 2,606,156

870
268.570
Other

28,352
To tal fresh
15,636, 120 415,074,024

To tal fresh

1,601,514 + 833 171,615 Unclassified, frozen,

Frozen, other

78,057 other 8.747,979 + 109 14,147,082 To tal fresh & frozen 1,679,572 + 879 171,615 Total fresh & frozen 24,384., 099 + 28 19,121,105 Steelhead trout: Herring:

Other

1,200

: Local

479,040
25,550 Frozen, other

3,900 Frozen, other

31,700 96 753,000 Total fresh & frozen 5, 100 To tal fresh & frozen 510, 740 34 778,550 Sturgeon: Lingcod:

Local

18,607 Local 6,511,350 + 135,743, 781 Other

450 Other 324, 783 + 312 21,484 To tal fresh

19.057 To tal fresh 6,836,133 + 19 5,765,265 Tench, local

109,364 Frozen, other

105 794

to

332 Tuna, Albacore: Total fresh & frozen 6,941,927 + 20 5,765,597 Local

773,212 + 660

101,748 Perch, local 220,904 + 84 120,105 Other

9.990 + 33 7,492 Pilchard, local 110,330

Total fresh

783, 202 + 616

109,240 Rockfishes:

All fish: Local 4, 201,400 + 154 1,652,344

Local

51,686,882 + 3 50,059,659 Other 164,422 + 364 4.399 Other

4.879,600 + 99 2,444,854 To tal fresh 4,365,822 + 163 1,656,743

Total fresh

56,566,482 + 8 52,504,513 Frozen, other

140,083 + 5 134,037 Frozen, other 16,852,964 + 39 12, 130,425 Total fresh & frozen 24.505.905 + 151 1,790,780

Total fresh & frozen 73,419,446 + 14 64,634,938 Sablef ish:

SHELLFISH Local

2,159,138

12 2,448,752 Clans, hard Theats): Other

5,909

+

300
Local

169,480 + 49

113,851 To tal fresh 2,165.047 12 2,449,052 Other

138,497) + 125 61 560 Frozen, other 2,881,074 361,858, 267 To tal fresh

307,977) + 75 175,411 Total fresh & frozen 5,046,121 17 4,307, 319 Frozen, other

126,823 Salmon:

Total fresh & frozen 434.400 + 148

175.411 Chinook or king:

Crabs, Dungeness: Local 4,630,869 23 5,988,332 Local

1,414,991 + 6 1,334,196 Other 1,718,424 - 202,141, 247 Other

33., 240 To tal fresh 6,349, 293 238,129,579

To tal fresh

1,448,231 + 9 1,334,196 Frozen, other

799.602

10 892,802 Lobsters, spiny(Calif.) Total fresh & frozen 7,148,895

5,100 other

21 9,022,381 Chum or fall:

Octopus, local

2,478 63 6,239 Local

2,767,879 556,134,024 Pysters (meats):

383. 404 Frozen, other

Local: 15.700

Olympia, shucked 34,579 14 42,177 To tal fresh & frozen 3.151, 283 51 6,149.724

shell

100

7,651

89

+

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TABLE I Volume and Source of Total Receipts, By Species, 1943 and 1942 (Continued)
1943

1943 Variety

compared
Variety

compared

1943
1943
and

1942
1942
with
and

with Source

1942
Source

1942 SHELLFISH (Cont'd. Pounds Percent Pounds

SHELLFISH (Cont'd.) Pounds Percent Pounds Oysters (meats) (Cont'd.)

All shellfish: Local:

Local

4,160,023 +48

2,801,033 Pacific, shucked 2,485,641 115 1,157,535 Other

502,151] +48 338.795 shell - 100 84,335 Total fresh

4,662,174 +4 3,139,828 Other, shell 2.450

Frozen, other

126,823 To tal shucked 2,520,238 + 110 1,199,712 Total fresh & frozen 4.788,997 +53

2,139,828 shell

2,450

97 91,986 All fish & shellfish: Total shell & shucked 2,522,688 + 95 1,291,698 Local

55,846,905 + 6 52,860,692 Scallops, bay( meats, local 9,076 - 72 32.375 Other

5,381,751 +93 2,783,649 Total fresh

161, 228,656 +10

55,644,341 Local

39,233 + 520 6,339 Frozen, other 16,979,7871 +40 12,330,425 Other 55.320

Total fresh & frozen 78,208,443 +15 67,774,766 To tal

94,553 +1390 6,339 LIVERS Shrimp meat, other

198,419- 28 277,35 Grayfish (Dogfish) 2,246,072 + 5 2,149,178 Squid:

Soupf in shark

454,853 +31 333,009 Local

4,527 72
16,335|| Total

2700,925 19 2,482,187 Other

69,125

Total fish, shellfish, To tal 73,652 + 350 16,335 and livers

80,909,368 +15 70,256,953 *No t classified separately in 1942

**Includes all sole except turbot. NOTE:

Sources listed as "local" are either direct landings or receipts from nearby areas.
Sources listed as "other" are receipts from Alaska, British Columbia, Oregon, California, etc.

Shrimp:

livered their catches to Alaskan ports and Prince Rupert, Canada. It was contended that more profitable prices could be obtained in the northern ports because the longer haul to Seattle, in most instances, involved shrinkage, loss of grade, and limited the number of trips that could be made before the season's end.

Excluding livers and shellfish items, total fresh and frozen fish receipts amounted to 73,419,000 pounds. of this volume, 16,853,000 pounds, or 23 percent, consisted of frozen fish from Alaska and other non-local sources, representing an increase of 39 percent over 1942. Halibut accounted for 52 percent of the total, all species of salmon, 28 percent; and sablefish, 17 percent; with the remaining 3 percent consisting of true cod, lingcod, and rockfishes. The 1943 receipts of frozen halibut, 8,748,000 pounds, were more than double those in 1942, and frozen sablefish increased over 1 million pounds, or 36 percent. Frozen chinook and silver salmon, however, declined 10 percent and 26 percent, respectively.

Receipts of fresh fish from local sources, including landings of the halibut pleet but not receipts of grayfish and soupfin shark livers and shellfish, totaled 51,687,000 pounds, or about 64 percent of the port's grand total of landings and receipts from all sources, This was 3 percent greater than the 1942 fresh fish figure of 50,060,000 pounds.

Receipts of fresh fish from other than local sources doubled as compared with the previous year due primarily to a 2 million-pound increase in halibut receipts. This development resulted from the dearth of halibut landings at Seattle after price ceilings went into effect.

Prices received by fishermen during the early part of 1943 were far above any paid in 1942. For example, during the first six months of 1943, the average price for chinook salmon reached 31.8 cents per pound compared to 18 cents in 1942. Halibut prices for the same period averaged 23.6 cents per pound for No. 1 and 21.7 cents for No. 2 compared to the 1942 average of 17.8 cents per pound for No. 1 and 16.6 cents for No. 2 fish. These price comparisons are for the first six months of 1943 only since OPA ceiling prices were established and became effective in mid-July of that year.

The Pacific Coast shark fishery, which expanded considerably during 1942, continued to grow during 1943 with receipts of livers of soupfin shark and grayfish (dogfish) increasing appreciably. Soupfin shark livers amounted to 462,000 pounds and sold for an average price of $4.55 per pound compared to the 1942 receipts of 333,009 pounds and average price of $4,26. Grayfish livers totaled 2,246,000 pounds and averaged 46 cents per pound compared to 2,149,000 pounds at 28 cents per pound received in 1942. Soupfin shark carcasses changed from a practically worthless item to one of relative importance in the shark fishery as evidenced by the fact that dressed and trimmed carcasses brought from 9 to 17 cents per pound during the latter months of 1943.

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