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Pacific mackerel, which has been lagging behind 1943 figures, took a sudden spurt as the season of heavy production got under way in September and now stands at 37,237,000 pounds for the 9-month period, as against 24,892,000 pounds last year. Almost the entire catch is canned, and the pack on September 30 was 391,151 cases, compared with the 1943 figure of 251,674 cases.

Reports from Alaska indicate an increase in the catch of herring, which supports one of the most important fisheries of the Territory. The season's operations resulted in a yield of 108,068,000 pounds, a gain of 24,000,000 pounds over last year. Alaska herring is used chiefly in the manufacture of meal for animal feeding and oil for various industrial uses.

The yield of oil from the Atlantic Coast menhaden fishery is slightly under last year's figures--4,437,406 gallons compared with 4,751,850--but with the season of heavy production in the important North Carolina fisheries just opening up, it is considered possible that much of the deficit may be made up before the end of the year.

FISH SALES CAMPAIGN BEGUN BY WFA AND FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

The War Food Administration and the Fish and Wildlife Service are cooperating in a national campaign to increase the sale of those fishery products now in greatest abundance. Material is being supplied to the press, radio, magazines, and to food and home economics editors. This national campaign is being supplemented by intensive sales promotion in certain cities where the dealers have organized to pay for posters, leaflets, car-cards, billboard signs, and other advertising material. The recent campaign in Pittsburgh produced splendid results and high expectations are held for those under way in Chicago and Detroit.

October 1 holdings of frozen fish were more than 30 million pounds greater than those on the same date in 1943 and the primary purpose of the campaign is to relieve the acute cold-storage problem.

OCF CONSULTANTS AND COORDINATORS DISCUSS PROBLEMS OF WAR AND PEACE

The second 1944 meeting of the industry consultants for the Office of the Coordinator of Fisheries was held in Washington, D. C., on October 23 and 24 in the Conference Room of the Secretary of the Interior. The conferences were opened by an address by Coordinator of Fisheries Harold L. Ickes.

Coordinator Ickes asked the consultants for an appraisal of problems in the light of changing war conditions. He stressed that reconversion of the fishery industries should be planned. Demand for many strategic materials was becoming less strong and eased restrictions on vessel building would soon be further stimulation to production of fishery products. Resulting problems of marketing and distribution would gradually replace those of procurement of materials and manpower.

Other addresses by Deputy Coordinator Gabrielson, Charles E. Jackson, and other members of the Coordinator's staff explained important developments in the Office's work since the previous meeting in February (see Fishery Market News, March 1944, pp. 9-10), and discussed the existent situation, particularly in manpower, engines and other materials, vessels, containers, and Naval regulations. The economic bases for post-war planning of the fishery industries were presented by Dr. Richard A. Kahn of the OCF. Mr. Leroy Christey explained the operation of the new Market Development Section of the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Deliberations on the second day were devoted to statements by the WFA and the OPA. Dr. Ockey, Chief of WFA's Civilian Food Requirements Branch reviewed the outlook for civilian food supplies. General policies of the OPA were discussed by Mr. R. B. Heflebower, Economist, Food Price Division, OPA.

In his address, Dr. Gabrielson proposed that upon dissolution of the Office of the Coordinator of Fisheries at the end of the war emergency, that the Fish and Wildlife Service retain field offices similar to those of the OCF. These offices would give assistance to the industry on the following problems:

1. The return of fishing craft which were taken for war uses,
2. The efficient use of the large fleet of fishing vessels constructed to meet the fish

production programs.
3. The proper disposal and distribution of those vessels built for military uses which,

if declared surplus, might be adapted to fishing operations.
4. The proper disposal and distribution of surplus materials such as engines and processing

equipment which may become available in considerable quantities.
5. The return to the industry of skilled personnel now in military service with as little

disruption as possible to them and the orderly pattern of production.
6. The charting of locations of expended war materials which may hinder or preclude operations

on many of the best fishing grounds,
7. The furnishing of authentic data and advice regarding the prices of fish, and the costs

of production and distribution in connection with establishment, suspension or removal

of price ceilings on fishery products,
8. The labor problems arising from increased production and lower prices,
9. The disposal of surplus stocks of fishery products released by the Government.
10. The finding of markets for fishery products, when the Government suddenly ceases buying

for military and Lend-Lease use.
11. The elimination of gluts and surpluses due to heavy production and inadequate marketing

facilities and methods,
12. The diversion of fishing operations to those species which are not being produced in

surplus or unmarke table quantities.
13. The provision of food and fuel for men and vessels, and fuel and tires for trucks, as

long as rationing exists.
14. The development of plans to produce, market, and process most efficiently with the

equipment, facilities, and labor available.
15. The provision of sufficient supplies of ice during summer shortages, and the develod-

ment of adequate freezing facilities and cold-storage space.
16. The adjustment of State and Federal fishing regulations unduly restricting operations.

The production of new fishery commodities, and the disposal of those war-fostered

fishery products which require marketing assistance in times of peace,
18. The salvage and preservation for peace time use of the investment in plants and equipment

constructed and purchased for war requirements.
19. The interpretation of Government peace time controls affecting the fishing industry.
20. The conduct of special surveys to furnish specific information on the industry for

urgent use.

17.

Dr. Gabriel son also outlined other types of assistance to the industry which the Fish and Wildlife Service considers should be carried over from their emergency status to a permanent peacetime basis. These include technical services to:

1. Introduce more efficient me thods of capture,

2. Develop better handling, processing, and sani tation,

3. Improve methods of transportation and marketing.

4. Disseminate research information,

Following discussion of problems by the consultants both as regional bodies and as a single group, these advisors passed resolutions as follows:

1. That following V-day, the Fish and Wildlife Service operate regional offices, similar

to the Area Coordinator's offices, as outlined by Dr. Gabrielson, as part of the

commercial fisheries work of the Service,
2. That the Coordinator of Fisheries continue the existing Pacific Coast concentration

and allocation plans at his discretion, subject to consultation with industry advisory

groups.
3. That the Secretary of State take cognizance of the importance of international fishery

problems and provide for a suitable organizational unit in the State Department, re

sponsible directly to the Secretaries of State, to handle such problems.
4. That $75,000 from Agriculture Department funds be made available to the Fish and Wild-

life Service for educational services as authorized by Congress,

5. That in addition to the $75,000, any additional funds needed for a national educational

campaign be provided to the Fish and Wildlife Service.
6. That the Secretary of the Interior stop withdrawing any more Alaska fishing areas what-

ever from the free and equal use of all American citizens on the same terms.
7. That representations be made to the WFA that they approve additional construction and

refrigerative equipment for the building of more cold-storage facilities in fishing
ports,

PILCHARD DIRECTIONS P-10 TOP-14 EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 17

P

On September 9, the Area Coordinator of OCF's Area II issued General Directions P-10 to P-14, effective September 17. Excerpts follow:

GENERAL DIRECTION NO. P-10--GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR PILCHARD PRODUCTION

A. Definitions--In construing all general directions, specific directions, instructions, delegations of authority, and other administrative instruments and statements based upon the Pilchard Order, the definitions in paragraph (c) of the order are applicable except where the context clearly indicates otherwise, Any general direction which may be issued adding or regrouping ports pursuant to paragraph (c) (4) of the Pilchard Order shall thereafter control the interpretation of all such directions, instruments, and statements, except where the contrary is clearly indicated by the context.

B. Effective Date--Except where a contrary provision is expressed, all general directions shall become effective on the date of issue. The general directions numbered P-10 to P-14, inclusive, now being issued, however, shall become effective at noon on Sunday, September 17, 1944.

C. Suspension of Directions Between Seasons--Except where expressly provided otherwise, all general directions shall be suspended, for the several ports in California, during the period between pilchard (sardine) seasons as defined for those ports, respectively, in Section 1065 of the California Fish and Game Code. However, any person may be held responsible after such suspension, for acts occurring during the pilchard (sardine) season. Suspension of all general directions does not affect the necessity for securing fishing permits, as required by paragraph (e) of the Pilchard Order for all operations in any gainful pursuit during the whole year.

D. Revocation of Former General Directions--The only general directions here tofore issued, those numbered 1 to 8, inclusive, are superseded by these general directions now being issued, and are hereby revoked.

GENERAL DIRECTION NO. P-1l--DISPATCHING SYSTEMS, SAN FRANCISCO AND MONTEREY

A. Systems Established--Pursuant to paragraph (i) (1) of the Pilchard Order, and because in the opinion of the representative of the Fishery Coordinator, it is necessary to do so for the reasons set out in that paragraph, systems are here by set up in San Francisco and Monterey for distributing pilchard landings by direction of each load brought in to those ports in any pilchard vessel of 20 net tons or over. No load of pilchard (sardines) shall be delivered by any such vessel to any processing plant in either of those ports, nor received from any such vessel by any person for such plant, except in accordance with a dispatching direction or other consent of the Port Supervisor or his Assistant. At San Francisco, the Port Supervisor or his Assistant will be stationed adjacent to the St. Francis Yacht Club Harbor; at Monterey the Port Supervisor or his Assistant, will be stationed at the United States Naval Section Base, Monterey Breakwater.

B. Directions to Vessels-- The master of each such pilchard vessel entering San Francisco to deliver pilchard sardines) shall report at once to the Port Supervisor or his Assistant at the waterfront, giving as near as may be his estimate of the weight of his load; he shall then receive directions as to the delivery of the load. The same procedure shall be followed on entering Monterey Bay, except that the report to the Port Supervisor at the waterfront shall include also a statement of his opinion as to the condition and size of the fish, and except for Voss Landing deliveries which are provided for in the following paragraph.

C. Moss Landing Deliveries--Any permittee operating such pilchard vessel fishing from Monterey and receiving directions from the Port Supervisor or Assistant Port Supervisor at Monterey to deliver all pilchard brought in during a specified period at Moss Landing, shall deliver his fish in accordance with such direction, except as provided in the last sentence of this paragraph. Any vessel making delivery of pilchard (sardines) at Moss Landing shall report to and receive delivery direction from the Assistant Port Supervisor on the waterfront at Moss Landing, such report to include the weight of his load and the condition and size of the fish as set out in the preceding

paragraph for other vessels entering Monterey Bay. Any permittee operating such pilchard vessel and arriving at Moss Landing to make delivery there, whether pursuant to directions received before going out fishing from the Port Supervisor or Assistant Port Supervisor at Monterey or pursuant to an emergency modification of his permit, and who finds on arrival at Moss Landing that the conditions of sea, tide, or weather make such delivery unduly hazardous, may report to the Port Supervisor or his Assistant at Monterey and receive substitute directions for delivery of his load,

D. Prompt Delivery--When directions have been given pursuant to the foregoing paragraphs A., B., or C., the master shall deliver his load at once in accordance with the direction. If an emergency exists preventing prompt delivery, the master shall apply to the Port Supervisor or his Assistant for modification of the direction given.

E. Operations of Smaller Vessels--Vessels of less than 20 net tons are not subject to control by the dispatching systems set up above; but the Port Supervisor and his Assistant will help the operator of such a vessel to find a market for any fish he brings in if they are large fish and in good condition, In the port of San Francisco, no person shall take any delivery of pilchard (sardines) from any such smaller vessel for processing, until af ter the Port Supervisor or his Assistant shall first have been informed, as by telephone from the processing plant, and shall have consented to such delivery. Any deliveries received from such vessels in either port shall be reported to the Port Supervisor just as are those received from larger vessels.

GENERAL DIRECTION NO. P-12--DISPATCHING SYSTEM, SAN PEDRO A. System Established--Pursuant to paragraph (i) (1) of the Pilchard Order, and because in the opinion of the representative of the Fishery Coordinator, it is necessary to do so for the reasons set out in that paragraph, a system is here by set up in San Pedro for distributing pilchard landings by direction of each load brought in to that port. No load of pilchard (sardines) shall be delivered by any vessel to any processing plant in that port, nor received by any person for such plant, except in accordance with a dispatching direction or other consent of the Port Supervisor or his Assistant,

B. Advance Dispatch--The Port Supervisor in San Pedro will receive joint applications, signed by the boat-owner and the processor concerned, to have a particular boat dispatched to a specified plant for a period of time in advance, and will act appropriately on all such applications; but any advance dispatch shall be subject to be modified by a direction, oral or otherwise, given pursuant to the preceding paragraph A., whenever reasonably necessary in the opinion of the Port Supervisor or his Assistant to attain the objectives of the Pilchard Order.

C. Cancellation and Replacement of Advance Dispatch--Any advance dispatch issued pursuant to the preceding paragraph B., is also subject to cancellation or modification by the issuance of another advance dispatch whenever reasonably necessary in the opinion of the Port Supervisor or his Assistant to attain the objectives of the Pilchard Order.

D. Promet Delivery--All pilchard (sardines) shall be delivered in accordance with whatever direction dispatching the fish shall be applicable, as soon as is reasonably possible af ter arrival in port. If an emergency exists preventing prompt delivery, the master shall apply to the Port Supervisor or bis Assistant for modification of the direction given.

GENERAL DIRECTION NO. P-13--SMALL FISH LIMTS, MONTEREY

A. Limit Fixed; Margin of Error--The maximum load of small pilchard (sardines) which may be brought into a port where this direction applies, in any one vessel, is fixed at 30 tons, and no person shall bring into the port a load of small pilchard (sardines) aggregating more than 30 tons in weight; provided, however, that where there has been a bona fide mistake in estimate ing the weight of the load a five-ton margin of error shall be allowed, so that if any person bringing in a load of small pilchard (sardines) has aimed to limit his load to 30 tons but unknowingly, by mistake, brings in not over 35 tons, he shall not be deemed to have violated this direction,

B. Receipt of Over-size Load--No person shall take delivery of any part of a load of small pilchard (sardines) in excess of 35 tons except pursuant to a direction expressly applicable to such excess tonnage given by the Port Supervisor or his Assistant with full knowledge of the facts; and where a load of pilchard (sardines) which it appears may violate this direction is being delivered, in order to enable the person receiving delivery to secure such a direction and clear himself of the danger of liability for violating it, the person making delivery should stop unloading for a reasonable time on a signal from the person receiving delivery, when 30 or more tons have been delivered.

C. Limit on Number of Loads--No person shall bring in more than one load of small pilchard (sardines) in any one vessel during one 12-hour period.

D. Definition--The phrase "loed of small pilchard" as used herein shall be taken to have the same meaning here tofore customarily given by the pilchard fishery and processing industry generally in the port concerned to that phrase, or to the phrase "load of small fish" or "load of small sardines," with the further limitations expressly set out above.

E. Application--This direction shall apply only to the port of Monterey, including Moss Landing.

GENERAL DIRECTION NO. P-14--LIMITATION OF DELIVERIES

A. Setting Limitations-- Whenever pilchard (sardines) are being brought in to any port in such quantities that in the opinion of the Area Coordinator for Area II, they are being unloaded only af ter unreasonable delay and resulting substantial loss of fishing time by some of the vessels or are being processed only af ter unreasonable delay and resulting substantial loss of food value from the product so that in his opinion it is reasonably necessary in order to accomplish purposes of the Piichard Order, the Port Supervisor, pursuant to instructions to be given by the Area Coordinator, shall limit the amount of pilchard (sardines) while each vessel may thereafter bring into such port daily. The limits shall be set by the Port Supervisor for each day at an amount which, in his opinion, will provide the maximum tonnage which will be unloaded and processed properly and without unreasonable delay on that day by the processing equipment and labor then available in that port. The limits shall be changed from day to day as deemed necessary by the Port Supervisor but except as otherwise provided herein shall be the same for all vessels on the same day.

B. Notice of Limits--No tice of the fixing of limits, and of the maximum tonnage limits set for each day, shall be given by posting a statement thereof at least two and one-half hours before sunset on the preceding day at the office of the Port Supervisor. If a notice is so posted, ignorance thereof by any person shall not excuse any violation of this direction. If any person interested does not secure information elsewhere as to the limit so fixed for a certain day, he shall secure it by telephone or other communication with the office of the Port Supervisor, before departing on the preceding day for fishing. But if any vessel remains out of por, for two or more successive nights, and for that reason fails to learn of the limit for the day on which it delivers fish, its delivery of fish up to the limit set on the day it left port shall not be considered a violation of this direction,

C. Exceptions for Specific Vessels--Whenever it shall have been determined by the Area Coordinator for Area II that the catch of eny vessel or group of vessels has been materially lowered by reason of their previously operating under permits amended pursuant to paragraph (f) (3) of the Pilchard Order, the Port Supervisor may set a higher limit for such vessels than for the remainder of the fleet. Whenever a pernit has been issued subject to the condition expressed in the permit or in a letter to the permittee accompanying the permit when issued, such condition specifying that it might be necessary to limit the catches of the vessel because the permit is being granted at the request of the permittee for a port which is already well supplied with vessels for the season, the Port Supervisor may set a lower limit for such a vessel than for the remainder of the fleet; moreover, the procedure described herein may be used to set limits applicable to such & vessel, when deemed necessary as set out in paragraph A. above, even though it is not deemed necessary to fix limits for other vessels in the port.

D. Violations--No person shall knowingly bring into sucn port a load of pilchard (sardines) in excess of the applicable limits so fixed; provided, however, that where there has been a bona fide mistake in estimating the weight of the load, a 5-ton margin of error shall be allowed so that if any person bringing in a load of pilchard (sardines) has aimed to keep his load within the applicable limit so fixed, but by mistake brings in not more than five tons in excess of that limit, he shall not be deemed to have violated this direction, In addition, the Port Supervisor may, in his discretion, delay dispatching any vessel bringing in such a load, for delivery of its load, or may cancel any dispatching direction already given for such load, or as to any part thereof, until all other pilchard deliveries in the port for that day are completed. He may also, in his discretion, set limits for the vessel for following days below those for other vessels in the port; the lowered limits may be such as to reduce actual deliveries by such vessel to an aggregate amount equal to or less than the aggregate tonnage it would have delivered if it had complied with this direction, No person shall take delivery of any part of a load of pilchard (sardines) in excess of five tons over the applicable limit for the load in question except pursuant to a direction expressly applicable to such excess tonnage given to the Port Supervisor or his Assistant with full knowledge of the facts.

E. Representative of Area Coordinator. Termination of Limits--Any of the Area Coordinator's functions under this direction, in his absence or inability to act, may be performed by his representative, limitation of pilchard catches as set out herein is a temporary expedient and shall be terminated by the Port Supervisor as soon as possible when by reason of amending permits or other change of circumstances it is in his opinion no longer necessary.

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