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(2) "California halibut" means those species of the flounder family

(Paralichthys californious) caught off the Pacific Coast, including

what is commonly called bas tard halibut, southern halibut, alabato. (3) "Black sea bass" means those fish caught off the Pacific Coast belong

ing to the sea bass family (Serranidae) commonly known as jewfish or

giant bass, (4) "white sea bass" means those fish commonly caught off the Pacific Coast

of the species Cynoscian nobilis. (5) "Totuava" means Mexican sea bass including grouper, commonly known as

grupa, and baya, caught in the Gulf of California, (6) "Rock bass" means those fish caught off the Pacific Coast belonging to

the family Serranidae and including those species commonly known as rock bass, kelp bass, sand bass, pinto, johnny verde, and corbina or

corvina,
(7) "Crab" means all crab caught off the Pacific Coast.
(8) Mueenfish" means the species Seriphus politus caught off the Pacific

Coast.
(9) "Kingfish" means the species Genyonemus lineatus caught off the

Pacific Coast.
(10) "Herring" means the species Clupea pallasii caught off the Pacific

Coast. (11) "Whitebait" means the species Allosmerus attenuatus and those small

fish commonly called and sold under the name whitebait caught off the Pacific Coast.

3. This amendment shall become effective October 2, 1944.

AMDT. 6 TO MPR-507 EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 26

Retail ceiling prices on fresh lake herring have been suspended, effective October 26, the OPA announced October 21. This action follows the suspension of wholesale ceiling prices for this species of fish on October 2, 1944.

Ceiling prices had been established for the period October 1 to December 15, the normal duration of the annual herring run. The suspension follows indications that the price for lake herring will generally be below the 1942 level of prices--the minimum level at which the Stabilization Extension Act requires fishermen's ceiling prices to be set, OPA said.

OPA said, however, that if fresh lake herring prices should rise above the 1942 levels, ceilings will be promptly reestablished.

Amdt. 6 to MPR-507--Ceiling Prices of Certain Fresh Fish and Seafood Sold at Retail-became effective October 26, 1944. Excerpts follow:

In Section 26, the item "Herring, Lake" is deleted from Table A-l.

AMDT. 36 TO MPR-418 EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 2

Ceiling prices on fresh lake herring, established for the period October 1 to December 15, the normal duration of the annual herring run, have been suspended effective October 2, 1944, the OPA said October 3. Ceilings for frozen and salted fish, accounting for two-thirds to three-fourths of the herring caught during this period, will remain in effect, the agency said.

Lake herring is the only species of fresh fish caught in the Great Lakes that is under price control. Prices of lake herring, as well as other cheaper varieties of Great Lakes fish, during the summer months generally have been below prices for the corresponding period in 1942, OPA said. Furthermore, such basic factors as the amounts of fish likely to be salted and frozen indicate lower prices for lake herring during this year's run.

For these reasons, OPA believes that ceiling prices will not be necessary to protect consumers.of fresh herring. The agency said, however, that if fresh herring prices should rise above 1942 levels, ceilings will be promptly reestablished.

Amdt. 36 to MPR-418--Fresh Fish and Seafood--became effective October 2, 1944. Excerpts follow:

In Section 22, Tables A, B, C, and D, a footno te 40 is added to the names of Schedule 62-Lake Herring (Leucich thys artedi) and Schedule 63--Lake Herring--Caught in Saginaw Bay (Leucich thys artedi) to read as follows:

40/The provisions of this regulation so far as they apply to Schedule 62--Lake Herring-

and Schedule 63--Lake Herring caught in Saginaw Bay--of Tables A, B, C, and D are
here by suspended.

AMDT. 37 TO MPR-418 EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 23

Fishermen's prices on round albacore (tuna fish) have been increased by 32 cents per pound on sales to canners and to the fresh market in Oregon and Washington, the OPA announced October 18. Sales to the fresh market in California have been increased by 15 cents per pound. This increase will be reflected at retail by about one cent a pound for the round fish--the most popular retail selling style of this fish. The rest of the increase will be absorbed at previous levels of distribution, OPA said. The price of cuts and fillets will be proportionately increased to the consumer by 2 to 3 cents per pound.

This action was necessary to meet the requirements of the Stabilization Extension Act of 1944, which stated that fishermen's prices could be no lower than the 1942 average prices. Since most tuna fish is canned, OPA said it will examine canned tuna fish prices to see if adjustments are necessary.

In announcing the new fishermen's price for fresh albacore, OPA said that the 2 cents differential allowed in California for sales to persons other than canners has been eliminated. This minimizes the increase on fresh albacore at retail. Approximate highest retail prices for the small amount of albacore sold fresh, round, to consumers in West Coast cities are as follows: Los Angeles, Portland, and Seattle, 40 cents a pound.

Amdt. 37 to MPR-418--Fresh Fish and Seafood--became effective October 23, 1944. Excerpts follow:

Maximum Price Regulation No. 418 is amended in the following respects: 1. Section 16 (b)

amended to read as follows:

(5) Charging, paying, billing or receiving any consideration for or in connection with any service for which a specific allowance has not been provided either in this Maximum Price Regula

tion No. 418 or in any regional order (under the authority delegated in Revised Maximum Price Regulation No. 165) which applies specifically to services performed in connection with the handing of fresh fish or seafood.

2. In Section 22, Tables A, B, C, and D, Schedule No. 43 are amended to read as follows:

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Prices in cents

per pound--January Style

through December Sched. Species

Item
of
Size

TABLE No.

No. Dressing

A B с D 43 Tuna, albacore (Pacific Coast) ).

1 Round

All sizes

1922 24. 25 Drawn

267282 Dressed ..

293 313 Center cuts

32 34 35 Tail cuts

292 311321 Head cuts

295 315 325

3132 Steaks ...

38 39 8 Fillets

46 49 50 TABLE A--MAXIMUM PRICES FOR PRODUCERS OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD, TABLE B--MAXIMUM PRICES FOR PRIMARY FISH SHIPPER SALES OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD. TABLE C-MAXIMUM PRICES FOR RETAILER-OWNED COOPERATIVE SALES AND SALES BY WHOLESALERS OTHER THAN PRIMARY

FISH SHIPPER WHOLESALERS TO OTHER WHOLESALERS OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD. TABLE D--MAXIMUM PRICES FOR CASH AND CARRY SALES OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD,

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The accompanying amendment to Maximum Price Regulation No. 418 fixes the producer's price for round albacore (tuna) at 191/2 cents per pound, an increase of 344 cents over the former Table A price. This increase is necessary to meat the requirement of Section 2 (i) of the Amergency Price Control Act of 1942, as amended by the Stabilization Extension Act of 1944. This amendment obliges the Administrator to fix fish prices to the fishermen at the average 1049 prices rather than the average 1941 pricos, as was provided in the original Act. This action brings the maximum prices for all tuna to the 1942 level.

The price of 191/2 cents established by this amendment is the 1942 average of fishermen's prices for both sales to canners and sales to fresh fish wholesalers. Accordingly, the addition of 2 cents per pound for fishermen's, sales of albacore to the fresh market in California established by Footnote 29 is eliminated and a uniform price is established for sales to canners and sales to the fresh market. This action minimizes the resulting increase in price to the retailer, and hence to the consumer.

Footnote 29 originally permitted the addition of 2 cents per pound to Table A prices on all sales to persons other than canners. It was added by Amendment No. 8 to this regulation, which established the wholesale prices for albacore. The prices fixed in Tables B, C and D Yor

round albacore were therefore based on
a 2 cent addition to the Table A price.
When Amendment No. 12 to this regula-
tion thereafter limited the applicability
of the 2 cent addition to sales in Call-
fornia, the prices listed in the other
tables were not changed, since at that
time the indications were that most of
the sales of fresh albacore to wholesalers
were made in California. This resulted
in an increase of 2 cents in the margin
between Table A and Table B with re-
spect to sales outside California, which
increase was reflected in the unchanged
prices listed in Tables C and D.

The present amendment increases the
prices formerly listed for round albacore
in Tables B, C and D by 14 cents per
pound. Since Footnote 29 has been
eliminated from the albacore schedule,
this increase preserves the wholesaler's
existing margins with respect to sales
in California. With respect to the in-
creasing volume of sales outside Cali-
fornia, the increase restores the original
Table B margin (the equivalent of the
Table B margin for sales in California),
and preserves existing Table C and Table
D margins.

Commensurate increases are also made in the prices of the various styles of processed albacore listed in the tables, based in each case on the processing yield. Thus prices for drawn albacore have been increased by 1/2 cents per pound, for dressed albacore and all cuts

by 134 cents per pound, for steaks by 2 cents per pound and for fillets by 2422 cents per pound, respectively.

This amendment sets the same margins for sales of tuna as exist for sales of other fresh fish in the same price range. These margins are now being reexamined. Since most of the albacore which goes into the fresh market is sold in the round, the increase in price at retail resulting from this amendment will be about one cent per pound.

The great bulk of tuna is sold to canners. A study is being made of the relation between the prices fixed for canned albacore under Maximum Price Regulation No. 299 and for fresh albacore by this amendment to determine whether the increased price of fresh albacore can be absorbed under present canners' ceilings, so that those ceilings reflect the producers' average 1942 price for the fresh fish.

Section 16 (b) (5) of this regulation is also amended to permit a charge for a service for which an allowance is provided in a regional order made under this regulation or Revised Maximum Price Regulation No. 165 specifically applicable to services performed in the handling of fresh fish or seafood, as well as for services for which a specific allowance is provided by this regulation. This makes possible the recognition of established local handling practices without increasing the dangers of evasion.

REGIONAL OPA ADDS DEFINITIONS TO FRESH FISH ORDER

Excerpts from OPA's Region VIII Rev. Order G-6 under MPR-418, Amdt. I follow:

Revised Order No. 6-6 under MPR-418, as amended, is hereby amended as follows:
1. Paragraph (a) is hereby amended to read as follows:
(a) Listed fresh fish and seafood items, The items covered by this order, hereafter

referred to as "listed fresh fish and seafood items," are: barracuda, California
halibut, black sea bass, white sea bass, to tuava, rock bass, live crab, cooked
crab in shell, and crabmeat, kingfish, queenfish, herring, rex sole, and white

bait. This order shall apply to Region VIII of the OPA,
2. Appendix I is hereby amended by deleting therefrom the word "Squid" and the accompanying

schedule of prices.
3. Paragraph (b) (5) is hereby amended to read as follows:
(b) (5) Rock bass means those fish caught off the Pacific Coast belonging to the family

Serranidae and shall include those species commonly known as rock bass, kelp bass,

sand bass, pinto, johnny verde, and corbina (corvina).
4. Paragraph (b) is hereby further amended by adling the following sub-paragranhs:

(17) Queenfish means the species Seriphus politus caught off the Pacific Coast.
(18) Kingfish means the species Genyone mus lineatus caught off the Pacific Coast.
(19) Herring means the species Clupea pallasii caught off the Pacific Coast.
(20) Whitebait means the species Allosmerus at tenuatus and those sall fish commonly

called and sold under the name white bait caught off the Pacific Coast.
5. This amendment shall be come effective October 2, 1944.

Frozen Fish Trade

RECORD FROZEN FISH STOCKS CROWD U. S. STORAGE PLANTS

Stocks of frozen fish and shellfish, which have been consistently higher this year than in 1943, are still mounting and on October 1 reached the record proportions of 131,584,000 pounds, according to the Service's Current Fishery Statistics 149.

Holdings of fishery products in freezers a month earlier stood at 123,255,000 pounds, at that time the highest figure ever reported. October 1 holdings were 33,000,000 pounds larger than those of October 1, 1943, which were of approximately average size for this season of the year.

Because of the critical shortage of cold-storage space, the Fish and Wildlife Service is cooperating with the War Food Administration in local programs in selected cities to hasten the movement of these stocks into consumption.

Halibut and Atlantic mackerel were the largest single items in the inventory of fish in storage, with holdings of 17,019,000 and 11,851,000 pounds, respectively. These figures show an increase of about 4,000,000 pounds for each species over holdings in October 1943.

Frozen fillets of such New England species as cod, haddock, rosefish, and pollock reached a total of approximately 16,000,000 pounds in storage, as against less than 10,000,000 a year previous. This is due in part to the fact that catches by boats operating out of New . England ports have increased sharply this year, while distribution facilities have failed to improve to a corresponding degree.

Among fresh-water species, twice as much whitefish and pikes (including pickerel, jacks, and yellow jack) were in storage as last year and three times as much lake trout and blue pike; while frozen stocks of lake herring rose from 289,000 pounds last year to 1,511,000 pounds.

These were croakers, shad,

A few species stood at about the same level as last year. swordfish, whiting, shrimp, yellow perch, and catfish.

Among the few to show decline were flounders, butterfish, sea herring, and spiny lobster tails.

Holdings of Fishery Products in the United States

Oct. 1 compared with
Item
Oct, 1, Sept.l, Oct.1, 5-year Sept. 1,

Oct. 1, 5-year 1944 1944 1943 average

1944

1943

average Pounds Frozen fish and shellfish:

Percent Percent Percent Pounds

Pounds Pounds To tal holdings

131,584,000 + 7 + 34 + 32 123,255,000 98,225,000 99,646,000

Important Items:
Fillets:
Cod

6,574,000 3 +190 +181 6,745,000 2,269,000 2,341,000 Haddock

5,275,000 + 8

+ 61

- 35 4,892,000 3,268,000 8,158,000 Rosefish

4,054,000 + 4 + 2 + 10 3,898,000 3,990,000 3,686,000 Flounders

1,855,000 11 . 11 + 33 2,080,000 2,095,000 1,397,000 Halibut 17,019,000 3 + 33 + 23

17,629,000 12,762,000 13,803,000 Herring, sea

1,694,000 12 - 43 + 9 1,922,000 2,997,000 1,560,000 Mackerel

11,851,000

+ 48 + 42 11,882,000 7,982,000 8,359,000 Sablefish

4,475,000 +

+ 94

+106 4,109,000 2,307,000 2,171,000 Salmon

11,253,000

+ 27

+ 29 + 25 6,856,000 8,727,000 9,000,000 Scup (porgies)

2,179,000 +

20 + 64 2,176,000 2,739,000 1,332,000 Whiting 10,587,000 + 13

10 9,410,000 10,607,000 11,799,000 Lake herring

1,511,000 22

+421

+ 51 1,929,000 290,000 999,000 Whitefish

2,015,000

. 2 +123 + 35 2,054,000 905,000 1,496,000 Shrimp

4,894,000 +137 + 18 + 31 2,063,000 4,163,000 3,739,000 Cured fish: Herring, cured 16,404,000 . 11 6

2 18,525,000 17,407,000 16,794,000 Salmon, mild-cured

2,744,000 + 30 + 36 56 2,113,000 2,020,000 6,285,000 "Since the date for reporting holdings of fishery products was changed from the 15th to the first of the

month beginning January 1, 1943, data included in the 15-year average" consist of a combination of

figures for the two periods. ** Less than 3 per cent..

SEPTEMBER FREEZINGS 5 PER CENT GREATER THAN SEPTEMBER 1943

Freezings of fishery products during September totaled 28,004,000 pounds, according to the Service's current Fishery Statistics 149. This was a decrease of 14 percent from

the production in August, but an increase of 5 percent when compared with September 1943. Substantial increases over September 1943 were reported in freezings of all important items except rosefish fillets, flounders, sea herring, and lake herring.

- 40

Freezings of fishery Products in United States and Alaskan Cold-storage Plants

September compared with Item

September August Sept. 5-year August September 5-year 1944 1944 1943 average 1944

1943 average Pounds Percent Percent Percent Pounds Pounds

Pounds Total fish and shellfish 28,004,000 - 14

+ 5

+ 9 32,602,000 26,607,000 25,646,000 Important Items: Croakers

56,000 - 90

56

542,000 128,000 93,000 Fillets: Cod

1,003,000 + 6

+120 +154 945,000 455,000 395,000 Haddock

1,445,000 5 +144 12 1,528,000 593,000 1,635,000 Pollock 195,000 +175 +427 - 59

71,000 37,000 470,000 Rosefish

2,582,000 41 · 46 12 4,372,000 4,779,000 2,938,000 Flounders

331,000 27 . 54 21 454,000 718,000 418,000 Halibut 1,773,000 24 + 40 + 6

2,330,000 1,268,000 1,677,000 Herring, sea

71,000 49 - 75 76 139,000 288,000 297,000 Mackerel 2,493,000 + 1 + 14 +

2,469,000 2,192,000 1,996,000 Sablefish 1,532,000 14 + 21 +

1,785,000 1,261,000 1,123,000 Salmon

3,901,000 26 + 58 + 69 5,267,000 2,472,000 2,312,000 Whiting

4,120,000 1 + 13 + 51 4,166,000 3,652,000 2,729,000 Lake herring 17,000 45 41 90

31,000

29,000 170,000 Shrimp

2,751,000
+167 + 17

+ 18

1,031,000 2,357,000 2,337,000 "Since the date for reporting freezings of fishery products was changed from the 15th to the first of

the month beginning January 1, 1943, data included in the "5-year average" consist of a combination of figures for the two periods.

BOSTON COLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS SHOW LITTLE CHANGE IN SEPTEMBER

Total fish and shellfish holdings in local cold-storage plants remained at a virtual standstill for the monthly period ending September 27, according to the Service's Market News office in Boston. Stocks on September 27 were 32 percent higher than on September 29, 1943,

Most of the principal items showed slight gains over August 30. Cod and mackerel made prominent gains of 10 percent and 5 percent, respectively. Pollock gained 25 percent, indicating that the pollcck season will soon be at its peak. Shrimp stocks showed a gain of 162 percent although the holdings were far below those of a year previous. Scallops showed a gain of ll percent but were still scarce in the wholesale markets.

Whiting in New England cold-storage plants continued to gain over previous 1944 and 1943 totals. With the end of the producing season expected soon, the bulk of the holdings has been accumulated and withdrawals will soon begin to exceed receipts. On September 30, 8,731,000 pounds of whiting were held, compared with 7,134,000 pounds on August 26, a gain of 22 percent.

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