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Surf clams from Long Island waters are now being canned in three different states as well as being sold for bait. The industry is providing gainful employment to many fishermen, transporters, openers, canners, and others.

Fresh Fish Trade

SEPTEMBER LANDINGS AT THREE PORTS SAME AS IN 1943

Fishing vessels delivering their catch to the ports of Boston and Gloucester, Mass., and Portland, Maine, in September landed 38,664,000 pounds of fishery products, valued at $2,004,000, according to Current Fishery Statistics No. 152 published by the Fish and Wildlife Service. This was 6 percent below August landings but was 271,000 pounds above those for September 1943. Rosefish, haddock, mackerel, cod, and whiting accounted for 93 percent of the September landings.

During the month, 256 vessels made 1,107 trips to the fishing grounds compared with 223 vessels which made 1,206 trips during September 1943. The over-all weighted average price per pound received by the fishermen was 5.18 cents as compared with 5.20 cents during August and 5.55 cents during September 1943.

Landings for the first nine months of 1944 amounted to 290,104,000 pounds, valued at $16,146,500, an increase of 7 percent in amount landed over the same period of 1943. The weighted average price for all landings was 5.57 cents per pound compared with 6.90 cents for the same months in 1943.

Landings by Fishing Vessels at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., and Portland, Maine Item September 1944 August 1944 September 1943

Nine mos. ending wi th September-1944

1 9 4 3 Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Pounds Cents* Pounds Cents Cod

3,446,965 -6.07 3,684,964 7.04 2,515,758 7.30 49,394,472 7.66 33,861,166 9.10 Haddock 9,622,086 6.88 8,708,397 6.86 8,952,408 6.90 75,651,556 7.40 78,857,179 9.31 Hake

856,360 6.07 668,580 5.68 1,017,117 4.92 5,631,748 4.71 3,011, 176 6.94 Pollock

814,495 4.48 441,478 4.40 558,106 4.45 9,861,978 5.17 8,162,044 8.06 Cusk

311,516 5.47 112,446 5.45 245,442 5.24 1,091,062 5.92 1,249,529 7.47 Halibut

1,611 17.13 5,963 14.12 2,870 21.88 138,833 17.72 151,801 24.12 Mackerel 8,865,591 4.86 8,144,951 5.18 7,490, 190 7.50 40,387,973 4.79

40,387,973 4.79 33,616,445 6.14 Flounders:

Gray sole 136,944 6.83 174,649 6.91 164,695 6.81 1,587,413 7.58 1,885,209 8.99 Lemon sole 60,410 7.99 58, 200 7.98 84,100 8.12 673,298 8.41 1,030,611 10.90 Yellowtail 40,985 4.44 70,699 4.50 168,744 4.77 1,317,963 5.95 2,240,508 6.88 Blackback 78,444 6.96 29,942 6.79 94,654 5.18 906,760 8.27 1,052,154 8.00 Dab

226,776 4.52 250,500 4.42 212,105 4.38 2,374,051 4.89 2,483,665 5.86 Fluke

315 14.92 Other

775

565 Swordfish

92,189 30.00 334,019 29.88 19,622 30.00 469,751 29.88 228,162 30.00 Rosefish 11,882, 888 3.72 15,134,267 3.72 14,532,751 3.73 85,762,848 3.79 80,291, 140 4.01 Whiting 2,160,727 4.21 3,371,906 4.10 2,084,119 4.25 13,259,915 3.87 19,421,021 4.24 Wolffish

5,964 4.01 12,115 4.21 12,932 3.93 843,712 5.16 558,447 7.70 Eelpout

149,555 3.70 108, 105 2.71 Scallops(meats)

74,520 30.00 105,652 35.45 617,226 46.58 Other 59.639 93.785 161,959

494,416

1,237,416 To tal 38,663.590 5.18 41,296,861 5.20 38,392,092 5.55 290,104,046 5.57 270,063,569 6.90 By ports: Boston 14,987,764 6.38 14,984,571 6.33 12,989,012 6.90. 121,937,930 6.78 119,386,651 9.00 Gloucester 21,903,645 4.45 24,259,011 4.62 23,696,281 4.91' 154,592,077 4.74 134,772,961 5.31 Portland 1,772,181 4.12 2,053,279_3.70 1,706,799_4.22 13.574,039 4.08 15,903,957_4.67 *Weighted average of prices per pound paid to fishermen,

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NEW BEDFORD LANDINGS DECLINE DURING SEPTEMBER

Fishery products landed by fishing craft at New Bedford, Mass., during September totaled 4,814,000 pounds, valued to the fishermen at $414,000, according to Current Fishery Statistics No. 151 released by the Fish and Wildlife Service. Production was 34 percent less than in August and 29 percent less than in September 1943. The reductions were due for the most part to a decline in yellowtail landings. In September 1943, 3,807,000 pounds were landed compared with 203,000 pounds in the same month in 1944, A similar reduction is noted when compared with the August 1944 data.

The weighted average price for all landings was 8,60 cents per pound compared with 7.02 cents for September 1943 and 8.44 cents for August 1944. Three items, haddock, cod, and blackbacks, accounted for 77 percent of the total arrivals. During the month, 133 craft mado 273 trips to the fishing grounds.

Landings for the first nine months of 1944 amounted to 63,524,000 pounds, an increase of 26 percent compared with the corresponding period of 1943. The 1944 receipts sold for an average price of 7.89 cents per pound. This compares with 9.48 cents received for nine months of 1943. Landings of yellowtail for the first nine months of 1944 totaled about 13.5 million pounds compared with 22.5 million pounds received in 1943.

U

Landings by Fishing Craft at New Bedford, Massachusetts
Item
September 1944 August 1944

Nine mos. ending with Sept.-
September 1943

1 9 4 4 1943 Pounds Cents* Pounds Cents* Pounds Cents* Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Cod

1,236,525 6.09 381,026 7.06 886,263 6.02 6,140,917 6.67 3,690,442 7.61 Haddock

1,700,347 7.00 2,441,343 6.99 780,733 6.95 17,892,911 7.12 6,714,808 7.74 Hake: Wai te

36,323 6.37 24,679 6.42 20,355 6.27 198,385 6.40 164,991 4.97 Red

1,919,808 1.90

125 1.60 Eelpout

3,224,239 6.43 3,179,129 3.15 Pollock

43,477 4.51 6,685 4.43 24,165 4.37 185,820 4.99 105,068 7.05 Cusk 355 5.35

355 5.35 Halibut

190 17.89

36,344 17.30 18,814 26.37 Mackerel

39,685 4.10 136,900 5.35 98,370 8.65 5,558, 205 4.91 4,377,610 6.76 Flounders: Gray sole

345 6.96
890 6.97

20 5.00 38,452 7.08 13,884 9.05 Lemon sole

289,836 8.00 233,614 8.00 204,640 7.33 2,718,308 8.71 851,036 11.11 Yellowtail

203,340 4.50 2,240,908 4.50 3,806,781 4.96 13,444,360 6.36 22,420,989 7.17 Blackback

774,664 7.00 879,964 7.00 501,345 5.64 7,684,126 7.04 5,140,316 6.69 Dab

1,225 4.49 1,045 5.65 597 4.69 68,947 4.92 108,316 8.02 Fluke

37,119 8.66 101,768 13.73 24,703 16.35 549,307 15.56 44,079 13.96 Swordfish

9,932 30.00 126,938 30.00 2,699 29.97 258,684 29.60 93,669 32.51 Rosefish

3,330 4.26 Whiting

14,552 3.90 39,070 2.62 10, 249 3.42 105,678 3.46 16,425 3.23 Wolffish

200 4.50
215 3.72

320 4.38 46,940 4.71 14,377 5.43 Scallops (meats)

397, 222 30.00 572,393 30.00 393,014 30.13 3,104,642 30.92 3,375,821 43.40 Other

28,698
57,202
22,191
342,813

151,108 To tal

4,813, 845 8.60 7.244,830 8.44 6,776,445 7.02 63.523,611 7.89 50,481,007 9.48 *Weighted average of prices per pound paid to fishermen,

SHELLFISH PROMINENT IN NEW YORK'S SEPTEMBER ARRIVALS

Receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products at the salt-water market for September showed practically no change from August, but decreased 7 percent under the September 1943 figures, according to the Service's New York Market News office. Yellowtail flounder production for September was small compared with the previous month and September 1943. The principal reason, according to fishermen, was the scarcity of this species on the usual fishing grounds. Almost offsetting this decrease, however, was an increase in the receipts of cod from New England.

Shellfish totals increased 21 percent over August, principally because the oyster production in the first "R" month reached full sway and because shrimp topped the August arrivals .by 834,000 pounds. Shrimp receipts surpassed those of September 1943 by 484,000 pounds.

The hurricane, which occurred in the middle of September, practically destroyed trap fishing off Long Island and New Jersey. Species of fish normally caught by this type of gear showed marked decreases. Of these, scup (porgy) alone remained important, but supplies of this fish were caught with balloon-type dragger nets.

Landings by fishing craft at New York City were down 15 percent from August and 54 percent under September 1943, but there was no appreciable decrease in receipts "over-the-road." September's receipts of fresh and frozen fish and shellfish brought the total for the first nine months of the year to 190,137,000 pounds.

Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products--Salt-water Market New York City*
Sept. Sept. compared with

August Seot, I tem

1944 August 1944 Sept. 1943 1944 1943 Classification:

Pounds Percent Percent Pounds Pounds Fish

13,399,000

10

14 14,857,000 15,548,000 Shellfish, etc.

8,276,000 + 23

+ 10 6,730,000 7,515,000 Total receipts

21,675,000

6 21,587,000 23,063,000 Important Items: Cod

2,045,000 + 92

+ 32 1,066,000 1,546,000 Flounders: Blackbacks

1,041,000 24

4

1,366,000 1,081,000 Yellowtail

319,000
75

1,288,000 1,937,000 Haddock

1,196,000 40

37 1,986,000 1,886,000 Mackerel

1,864,000 + 11

2 1,675,000 1,830,000 Salmon

837,000 +275

223,000 12,000 Scup (porgy)

764,000 + 27

600,000 618,000 Whiting

904,000
+ 14

791,000 1,021,000 Clams, hard

3,022,000

14
+ 1

3,521,000 2,989,000 Lobsters, live

577,000
9

631,000 597,000 Oysters, shell

1,157,000

+ 9

11,000 1,064,000 Shrimp

2,303,000 + 57

1,469,000 1,819,000 Butterfish

348,000 54

750,000 960,000 Halibut

332,000 - 35

514,000 350,000 Weakfish

336,000 · 19

416,000 474,000 Arrivals by: Fishing vessel

992,000
- 15

· 54 1,165,000 2,146,000 Truck, freight, and express

20,683,000

1

1

20,422,000 20,918,000 *Excluding imports entered at New York City

+

+ 24

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GULF SHRIMP AND OYSTER PRODUCTION GAIN IN SEPTEMBER

Shrimp and oyster production showed large gains in September over August, according to the Service's Market News office in New Orleans. Totals for the nine-month period from January through September were still considerably under those for 1943, however,

Production of hard crabs and salt-water fish, both of which suffered decreases from August, continued to lead 1943 production at the end of the first nine months.

Compared with 12 months 9 months Jan.-Dec. 1943

1943 Percent

1944

Bbls.

138,874 251,394

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390, 268

Production of Fishery Products in the Gulf States*
September 1944

9 months I tem

Unit
September
compared with

Jan.-Sept.
1944 Aug. 1944. Sept. 1943

Percent Percent
Shrimp:
· For canning

33,318
+32

61,425
Other
37, 168 +28

144,759 To tal

70,986
+30
+17

206,184
Oysters:
For canning

326,889 Other

12,040
+61
- 3

155,835 To tal

12,040 +61

- 3

482,724 Crabs, hard Lbs. 887,000 -44

+23 9,391,588 Crabmeat, fresh-cooked

95,830 -50

+ 4

928.685 Saltwater fish

321, 190 -10

- 24

3,579,821 Freshwater fish

52,520 -24

+ 6

563, 886 "Includes production in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas,

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CHICAGO RECEIPTS IN SEPTEMBER GAIN 11 PERCENT OVER AUGUST

Receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products in the Chicago wholesale market in September, totaling 6,049,000 pounds, were il percent above those of August, but they were 14 percent below those of September 1943, according to the Service's local Market News office. Although all three general classifications made gains from August, increase in the shellfish group was greatest. This was due mainly to an increase of 428,000 pounds, or 89 percent, in shrimp arrivals. The fresh-water total rose 3 percent as lake trout, the leading item in this category, gained 9 percent and whitefish, second in volume, dropped 25 percent. Saltwater species, led by seasonal arrivals of halibut, rose 5 percent.

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Classification:
Fresh-water fish
Sal to water fish
Shellfish, etc.

Total receipts

Important Items:
Caro
Lake herring
Lake trout
Suckers
Whitefish
Yellow perch
Tellow pike
Halibut
Rosefish fillets
Shrimp

Leading Sources:
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Wisconsin
British Columbia

Domestic to tal
Imported to tal

Transported by:
Truck
Express
Freight

222,000 177,000 537,000 195,000 333,000

34,000
221,000
1,093,000

256,000
968,000

35

9 13 - 27 + 10 - 88

11

2,149,000
2, 145,000
5,572,000
1,516,000
5,163,000
1,519,000
2,802,000
4,643,000
1,879,000
3,063,000

+11
-10
+25

2

1 -52 +39

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4,419,000 4,100,000 7,002,000 2,470,000 4,671,000 2,079,000 3,733,000 11,436,000 1,943, 000 8,793,000

- 37 + 1

+ 25

+257

-43

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- 35
- 72

443,000
288,000

696,000
1,199,000
3,851,000
2,198,000

- 18

-27 -32 -13 -52

+ 10

2,185,000 4,482,000 5,788,000 4,724,000 31,931,000 17,567,000

+ 64

23 + 9

5,343,000 8,913,000 9,257,000 10,707,000 57,066,000 26,968,000

+ 5
+ 23

-22
-18

1,052,000 2,751,000 2,245.000

13 + 77

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SEATTLE RECEIPTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS CONTINUE TO DECLINE IN SEPTEMBER

Seattle receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products declined 20 percent in September compared with August, according to the Service's local Market News office. Practically all species of importance except salmon and shark evidenced a pronounced decline in receipts on the local market. The heavier receipts of salmon were due to the Columbia River gill net and Indian-caught Celilo Fall operations. The balibut fishery in Area III entered its final stages with approximately 5 million pounds of the season's quota remaining to be caught by November 30.

Otter-trawl receipts continued, with few exceptions, to decline at a rapid rate, due to the critical lack of cold-storage freezing facilities and space which caused trawl vessels to fish for dogfish for livers. There was a one-day tie-up of the otter-trawl fleet on September 27, but this was terminated when dealers agreed to pay the winter prices for species caught by this type of gear.

8

Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Seattle

September 1944

9 mos,

Compared with 12 months Item

September
compared with

Jan.-Sept.

9 months Jan. -Dec. 1944. Aug. 1944. Sept. 1943 1944

1943

1943 Classification: Pounds Percent Percent Pounds Percent

Pounds To tal fish and shellfish

5,231,000 -20

43 50,798,000 -18 82,471,000 Important Items: Halibut 1,150,000 -24

14,380,000 -30 24,384,000 Lingcod 578,000 -15 +129

5,539,000 -11

6,942,000 Rockfish

360,000
-40
• 41
3,516,000 +1

4.506,000 Sablefish

480,000 -42

52
2,817,000 -15

5,046,000 Salmon 1,401,000 +68

7,054,000 -31

16,895.000 Shark

8,000 +60

440,000 -62

1,679,000 Sole

336,000 -43

5,542, 000

-31

10,093.000 Tuna

195.000
-33
28
515,000 +40

783.000 Livers

448,000 -56

27
5,111,000

+80

4,210,000 "Halibut and shark fleets and receipts from local and all other sources.

49

O

NEW ENGLAND FRESH FISH PRICES UNCHANGED FOR WINTER

There will be no increase in fishermen's ceilings for pollock, whiting, and blackbacks under the regular schedule of winter ceiling prices effective for most species of New England fresh fish on October 1, the OPA announced October 3. On most species of fresh fish different prices are set up for a six-month winter season and a six-month summer season, OPA explained. These schedules reflect normal price trends.

Last winter OPA announced that it would place a six-cent price on pollock for October through March in place of the existing winter price of seven cents for December through March and 4cents in October and November. This would have reduced the price by one cent for four months and raised it by a cent and a half for two months.

A more careful study of the normal seasonal movement of pollock shows that the price for this fish does not ordinarily rise until December. OPA has decided, therefore, to leave the higher winter price of seven cents but apply it only for four months. This price becomes effective December 1, 1944, and will prevail through March. Together with a 4-cent price for the rest of the year, this ceiling will provide fishermen with 1942 average prices, OPA said.

The present two cents per pound price to the fishermen on round whiting will remain in effect until November 1, 1944, at which time the price will rise to 2 cents per pound until May 1, as provided for in the regulation, OPA explained.

Similarly, the present price of seven cents per pound on blackbacks will remain in effect until December 1, when it will rise to 10 cents per pound and will remain at that level until April 1.

PACIFIC OPA SETS RETAIL MARGINS FOR FRESH FISH SOLD IN WEST

Excerpts from OPA's Region VIII Order G-l under MPR-507, Amdt. 3 follow:

1. Paragraph (a) is hereby amended to read as follows:
(a) Mark-ups for fresh fish and seafood. Table A sets forth per pound mark-ups over "net

cost" allowed to retailers for fresh fish and seafood items covered by this regulation,
by species.

per lb.

per lb,

per lb.

Table A
Whole fish sold on gross weight Fillets, cuts and steaks

and prepared to the customer's or seafood items sold as Item

order

purchasedl
I and II

III and IV I and II III and IV
Cents
Cents Conts

Cents

per lb. 1. Barracuda

9

8
9

7 2, California halibut

10

8
10

10 3. Black sea bass

11

9 4. White sea bass

9

10

10 5. Rock bass

10

11

11 6. Crab (cooked in shell)

9

7 7. Crabmeat ...

18

18 8. Mexican sea bass or To tuava

9

9 9. Queenfish 10. Kingfish 11. Herring 12. White bait 13. Rex sole (for localities except San Francisco)

7

5 14. Rex sole (San Francisco

7

6 1 Retailers processing items prior to offering for sale at retail who price in accordance with Section

18 (a) (2) and Section 18 7b) (2) of MPR-507, as modified by paragraph (c) hereof shall use these tables.

197777

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2. A new paragraph (g) is hereby added to read as follows:
(8) Definitions. (1) "Barracuda" means all types of barracuda (Sphyraenidae) caught off the

Pacific Coast.

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