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Frozen Fish Trade

JULY 1 FROZEN FISH STOCKS 52 PERCENT ABOVE YEAR EARLIER

Domestic cold-storage holdings of fishery products increased during June, and on July 1 had risen to 89,987,000 pounds--29 percent above the stocks held on the first of May, according to data published in Current Fishery Statistics No. 136 by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, July 1 holdings were 52 percent higher than those on July 1, 1943. The five leading items in freezers on July 1 were halibut, mackerel, cod fillets, whiting, and haddock fillets,

Stocks of mild-cured salmon were 65 percent below those held on July 1, 1943.

+ 47

+

Holdings of Fishery Products in the United States

July 1 compared with
Item
July 1, June 1, July 1, 5-year

June 1,

July 1, 5-year 1944 1944 1943 average 1944

1943

average Pounds Percent Percent Percent Pounds Pounds Pounds Frozen fish and shellfish: Total holdings

89,987,000 + 29

+ 52

+ 34 69,672,000 59,162,000 67,222,000 Important Items: Croakers

2,157,000 + 28

+ 27
- 2

1,679,000 1,700,000 2,197,000 Fillets: Cod

6,867,000 + 6 +376 +226 6,497,000 1,444,000 2,106,000 Haddock

4,011,000 + 31 +239 - 11 3,063,000 1,182,000 4,519,000 Rosefish 2,779,000 + 58

. 8 1,760,000 1,892,000 3,018,000 Flounders

1,943,000 + 35 2 + 71 1,436,000 1,901,000 1,135,000 Halibut

9,285,000 +1001

- 7

15 843,000 9,973,000 10,927,000 Herring, sea

2,657,000 4 26 + 36 2,774,000 3,582,000 1,950,000 Mackerel

9,019,000 + 48 +135 +114 6,091,000 3,835,000 4,212,000 Seblofish

1,267,000

+105 + 66 1,269,000 619,000 763,000 Salmon

1,934,000 + 39 + 38

• 74

1,388,000 1,406,000 7,544,000 Scup

1,729,000 + 37 4 + 53 1,261,000 1,791,000 1,132,000 Smelt

1,081,000 10 + 94

- 17 1,206,000 556,000 1,300,000 Whiting

5,353,000 + 137 + 1 - 20 2,257,000 5,317,000 6,731,000 Lake herring

2,190,000 5

+623 +164

2,312,000 303,000 829,000 Whitefish

1,958,000 1

+214 + 97

1,970,000 624,000 994,000 Shrimp 1,869,000 2 16

41 1,912,000 2,222,000 3,168,000 Cured fish: Herring, cured 18,664,000 + 16 4

6 16,127,000 19,398,000 19,837,000 Salmon, mild-cured

499,000 + 105 - 65 - 88 243,000 1,416,000 4,272,000 *Since the date for reporting holdings of fishery products was changed from the 15th to the first of the month beginning January 1, 1943, data included in the "5-yr, average" consist of a combination of figa ures for the two periods. **A decrease of less than one-half percent.

FREEZINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS DURING JUNE 22 PERCENT GREATER THAN 5-YEAR AVERAGE

Freezings of fishery products during June, as reported by domestic freezers, totaled 36,162,000 pounds, an increase of 11 percent above the production for May, according to information published in Current Fishery Statistics No. 136 by the Fish and Wildlife Service. The June production of frozen fish and shellfish was 22 percent greater than the 5-year average for this period. Halibut, whiting, mackerel, and rosefish were the principal items frozen during the month. Since the Pacific Coast halibut fishery did not get under way until late in May, June freezings of this species were far greater than in the previous month.

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Freezings of Fishery Products in United States Cold-storage Plants

June compared with
I tem
June May June 5-year May

June

5-year 1944 1944 1943

average 1944

1943

average Pounds Percent Percent Percent Pounds Pounds

Pounds Total fish and shellfish 36,162,000 + 11

+ 22 32,640,000 36,025,000 29,718,000 Important Items: Croakers

663,000 46 +18 - 21 1,104,000 563,000 840,000 Fillets: Cod

1,696,000 59 +51 +101 4,143,000 1,126,000 843,000 Haddock

1,742,000 30 +57 - 22 2,472,000 1,112,000 2,235,000 Rosefish 3,733,000 + 29

2,898,000

3,720,000 2,656,000 Flounders 739,000 14 -47

858,000 1,384,000 524,000 Halibut

7,922,000 + +51 + 85 588,000 5,241,000 4,287,000 Mackerel

4,401,000 - 21 +21

+ 61

5,560,000 3,631,000 2,736,000 Salmon

848,000 + 115 + 6 . 18 394,000 802,000 1,028,000 Scup

673,000 - 30 -37

+ 18

957,000 1,060,000 568,000 Whiting

4,540,000 + 277 -27

- 30 1,203,000 6,197,000 6,442,000 1,041,000 + 52 -24

5

683,000 1,371,000 1,099.000 *Since the date for reporting freezings of fishery products was changed from the 15th to the first of the month beginning January 1, 1943, data included in the "5-yr, average" consist of a combination of figures for the two periods. ** An increase of less than one-half percent.

+ 40

Shrimp

NEW YORK COLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS INCREASE 12 PERCENT IN JUNE

Once again holdings of frozen fishery products in New York cold-storage warehouses showed an increase over the preceding month, according to the Service's Fishery Market News office in that city. The largest gain, 485,000 pounds, was shown under the classification "Unclassified Salt-water," a category which it is hoped may soon be reduced by more detailed reports, Haddock fillets registered a material increase of 253,000 pounds and scup stocks rose 179,000 pounds. Steak and market cod decreased 54 percent because an inventory of over 200,000 pounds carried in one warehouse for a long period was withdrawn in June. Although fresh shrimp was received in greater quantity during June than for some months previous, holdings of frozen shrimp decreased to the point where they were the lowest in many years.

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Holdings of fishery products in Boston cold-storage warehouses increased 29 percent during the four weeks ending June 28, according to the Service's local Market News office, and were 67 percent larger than those of June 30, 1943.

All important items contributed to the June increase with the exception of pollock fillets, smelt, and shrimp. Mackerel fillet and mackerel increases were greatest due to exceptionally heavy landings by the seining fleet.

Most items showed large increases over the comparable 1943 totals. Mackerel and mackerel fillet stocks increased 1,559,000 pounds, this gain making up much of the total 5,488,000pound increase.

Whiting holdings in cold-storage plants in New England on June 24 amounted to 1,505,000 pounds, a seasonal increase of 528 percent compared to May 27. This was, however, a decrease of 39 percent compared to June 26, 1943.

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Stocks of frozen fishery products held in Chicago cold-storage warehouses continued to increase in June, reaching a total of 7,614,000 pounds on the last Thursday of the month, according to the Service's Chicago Market News office. Moderate gains in stocks of many of the more important fresh-water fish and large gains in a few of the salt-water items, including shrimp, accounted for an over-all increase of 9 percent compared with the last Thursday in May. Compared with one year previous, stocks were up 154 percent.

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Stocks of frozen fresh fish in Canadian cold-storage plants on Julyl totaled 26,524,000 pounds, an increase of 37 percent over the holdings of June 1, according to the preliminary data released by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Stocks of both halibut and mackerel increased over 400 percent during the month, Compared with July 1, 1943, an increase of 22 percent in total holdings was indicated. The only items showing decreases were mackerel, sea herring, and halibut, while tullibee, whitefish, and salmon holdings were much greater. Stocks of cod fillets, halibut, and sea herring accounted for more than 50 percent of the total volume of fresh frozen fishery products held in Canadian plants on July 1.

Holdings of frozen smoked fish, which totaled 2,067,000 pounds, were 13 percent above stocks of June 1, and 105 percent above those of July 1, 1943.

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Canadian cold-storage plants froze 14,734,000 pounds of fresh fish during June, according to data released by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. This was 61 percent more than the freezings during May and 32 percent more than June 1943. All items showed large increases except sea herring.

Smoked fish frozen during June declined 10 percent compared with May, but was 43 percent greater than in June 1943.

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Freezings of Fishery Products in Canadian Cold-storage Plants

June

June compared with I tem

1944 May 1944 June 1943

Pounds Percent Percent
Frozen fresh fish
Total freezings

14,734,000 + 61

+ 32
Important Items:
Cod:
Whole

570,000
+124

. 10 Fillets

3,792,000 + 16

+ 27 Haddock fillets

252,000 +250

. 52 Salmon

800,000

+ 38 Halibut

5,302,000

+102 Sea herring

1,003,000 71

+606 Mackerel

1,256,000 +921

+ 36 Whitefish

273,000

+51 Frozen smoked fish Total freezings

1,228,000

10

+ 43 Important Items: Fillets; cod, haddock, etc.

1,010,000 - 19 + 56

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AMDT. 19 TO MPR-364 EFFECTIVE JULY 1

Temporary increases of là to 3ž-cents a pound in the processor's ceiling prices on certain species of Pacific Coast frozen fillets became effected through restoration of last summer's prices, the OPA announced on July 1. Although retail prices for these items will be increased by an average of 5 cents a pound, it is unlikely that any substantial quantity

will be sold through retail channels. Most of the production of these fillets is sold to the Armed Forces.

Frozen fish processors' present and new per pound prices on some of the fillet items are as follows:

Item
Ling cod fillet
Rock cod fillet
Petrale sole fillet
Other sole fillets

Present

Price .23 ,23 257

New Price
(last summer's price

.27
.25
.27
.27

232

The processors' prices established in the action, effective July 1, 1944, are the result of re-examination of prices established in a previous amendment on May 20, 1944, which reduced prices substantially. (Amdt. 18 to MPR-364)

The new prices are being issued in the light of information received from the trade, which raised a question as to the adequacy of certain margins established, OPA said.

An incompleted accounting survey by the pricing agency has not as yet produced complete confirmation as to the correctness of the industry's information. However, OPA said it has decided to issue the temporary changes in prices until such time as the survey is completed and the data analyzed, because of the procurement needs of the Armed Forces for these products. These prices are those that generally existed for these species last summer, OPA said,

The action makes other changes in the regulation of special interest to the trade. They are as follows:

1. In line with the provisions in the fresh fish regulation, the service and delivery mark-up is restricted to deliveries from the seller's own vehicle or one used solely for

This mark-up cannot be taken where deliveries are made in a pooled truck or in a cart.

2. The regional administrators are given authority to adjust the invoice requirements
of the regulation to meet local conditions where a buyer and seller are both located within
a region.

3. Canadian lake fish, that were placed under price control in Amdt. 13 (MPR-364), in-
cluded fish caught in "Lake of the Woods" in Minnesota, and several other international
bodies of water. The action removes fish caught in these waters from the frozen fish and
seafood regulation and places them back under the General Maximum Price Regulation.

4. In line with the definitions established in the fresh fish regulation, a wholesaler is defined as a person who buys frozen fish and seafood and resells 20 percent or more of such fish or seafood to persons other than ultimate consumers; a retailer is defined as a person other than a purveyor of meals or a chain store warehouse, who buys frozen fish and seafood and resells more than 80 percent of such items to ultimate consumers.

A carload is so defined as to make clear that it means a shipment of not less than 24,000 pounds net weight of frozen fish,

Certain other minor changes are made to clarify the pricing provisions that already exist in the regulation, OPA said. Amdt. 19 to MPR-364--Frozen Fish and Seafood--became effective July 1, 1944. Excerpts follow:

1. Section 2 is amended to read as follows:

SEC. 2. How processors' marimum prices are fixed-(a) General rule. The processor's maximum price for sales of frozen fish or seafood, except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d) and (e) of this section, is the applicable listed base price in section 14, with any appropriate adjustment for kind of package as provided in section 13, plus any transportation cost allowable under section 3a (a). . This is the maximum price f. o. b. shipping point nearest freezer or other warehouse.

(b) Branch warehouse sales. Where the processor receives frozen fish or seafood in carload lots at a warehouse remote from the original freezer and sells and delivers such frozen fish or seafood in less-than-carload lots from the stock of such warehouse, his maximum price f. o. b. shipping point nearest warehouse for such sales to wholesalers, government agencies, retailer-owned cooperatives or chain store warehouses is the applicable listed base price in section 14, with any appropriate adjustment for kind of package as provided in section 13, plus any transportation cost allowable under sec

tion 3a (a) (1), plus a mark-up of 12 percent applied to the sum of the foregoing, plus any transportation cost allowable under section 3a (a) (2).

However, the prices established in this paragraph (b) may be charged by such processor only if he has two or more full-time employees stationed in the city where such warehouse is located and such employees are engaged in selling and handling frozen fish or seafood at such warehouse solely for such processor. Furthermore, the prices established in this paragraph (b) apply only to sales of those species of frozen fish or seafood which the processor, during the

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