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Total landings at the three ports for the year 1943 amounted to 331,363,060 pounds, valued to the fishermen at $22,520,198. Compared with 1942, this was a decline of ll percent in volume, due for the most part, to the following decreases in receipts: haddock, 20 million pounds; rosefish, 14 million pounds; pollock, 8 million pounds; and whiting, 6 million pounds. Mackerel deliveries increased 8 million pounds. The total weighted average value for 1943, 6.80 cents per pound, compared with a figure of 5.18 cents per pound for 1942.

Considering the landings by ports, receipts at Boston and Portland decreased 27 and 11 percent, respectively, from the previous year, while those at Gloucester increased 8 percent.

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Landings by Fishing Vessels at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., and Portland, Maine
I ten
December 1943 November 1943

Trelve months ending with--
December 1942

December 1943) Deconber 1942 Pounds Cents Pounds Conts* Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Pounds Conts Cod

884,408 8.20 4,495,653 8.13 904,978 10.55 42,419,345 8.90 43,260,070 6.04 Haddock

527,911 8.96 4,475,924 8.84 2,982, 219 11.14 90,193,229 9.25 109,799,196 6.83 Hake

362,484 7.44 680,812 8.26 218,015 9.80 4,822,937 7.35 3,723,585 6.15 Pollock

2,316,328 6.91 5,398,816 4.48 5,175,272 7.64 17,375,117 6.49 25,393,157 5.66 Qusk

40,824 7.37 188,095 7.56 98,932 9.02 1,736,943 7.48 2,512,195 5.88 Hal ibut

388 19.85

5,599 18.00 2,405 42. 20 165,307 23.63 474,678 19.33 Mackerel

395, 890 12.18 57,990 9.12 36,710,655 6.49 28,503,716 5.48 Flounders: Gray sole

97,894 8.82

133,173 9.00 117,120 10.78 2,234,986 8.97 2,750, 806 6.40 Lemon solo

6,480 10.99 22,085 20.41 1,102,411 10.96 1,412,085 10.18 Yellowtail

159,463 7.34 426,185 7.40 178,900 7.28 2,939,803 6.99 5,613,651 4.02 Blackback

57,824 9.27 86,320 8.83 83,685 10.17 1,263,453 8.16 1,334,838 6.19 Dab 100, 202 6.31 202,751 6.80

153,590 8.3 2,983,021 5.97 2,763,260 4.38 Other

4,170

565

25,397 Swordfish

228,162 30.00 114,776 36.28 Rosefish

4,765,746 4.16 6,094,063 4.22 2,100,361 4.34 101,332,717 4.05 115, 146,964 3.01 Tuna

7,108 9.44 88,949 5.14 896,202 5.22 233, 817 6.97 21,698,645 4.27 28,109,171 4.15 Wolffish

8,455 6.04 16,935 7.42 14,594 8.46 597,882 7.66 994,702 4.21 Scallops (meats)

80 40.00 34,190 35.00 27,671 49.53 699,572 45.21 505,702 32.52 Other, fresh 576,931

521,479

13,166

2,858,310 Total

2,987, 887 5.65 24,058,567 6.35 12,388,970 8.35 331,363,060 6.80 372,967.905 5.18 By ports: Boston

149,349 7.19 11,946,196 7.68 7,494,579 9.60 142,975,235 8.82 194,687,188 6.45 Gloucester

9,270,524 5.60 11,304,027 5.03 4,124,681 6.71 170,098,754 5.32 157,740,961 3.86 Portland

627.914_5.96 808,344_5.14 769.710 4.94 18, 289,071 4.76 20.539,756 3.31 "Weighted average of prices per pound paid to fishermen,

Whiting

522,848

CHICAGO RECEIPTS OF FISH AND SHELLFISH DECLINE DURING DECEMBER

Receipts of fresh and frozen fish and shellfish during December showed a substantial decline from November for most varieties, the Service's Chicago Market News office reported. The month marked å transition period in some producing areas from fall to winter fishing with an attendant change of gear, accounting in considerable measure for the reductions. An upward trend in receipts of frozen halibut and salmon offset to some extent the shortage of other items. Lack o fresh, frozen and filleted salt-water fish from the Eastern seaboard was an effect of the tie-up of North Atlantic fishing vessels. December receipts compared to December 1942 represented a materially increased production of most species. The 12-month total of 84,000,000 pounds received during 1943 was 23 percent greater than the 1942 total, a further indication of the rapidly growing importance of Chicago as a principal marketing and distribution center.

Although imports from Canada during December 1943 were generally heavier than for November, arrivals from the six largest producing States, with the exception of Washington, showed substantial declines. Reduction in supplies from the following States contributed the major portion of the nionth's decline: shrimp from Louisiana; fresh, frozen, and filleted fish from Massachusetts; and lake herring, lake trout, and whitefish from Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Frozen halibut and salmon from Washington and British Columbia, and fresh and wintercaught fresh-water fish from the Canadian Prairie Provinces contributed in large part to December's increase for these particular producing areas.

While there was a general reduction in December from November totals in the receipts via all classes of carriers, a comparison of the 12-month receipts for 1943 with 1942 shows a 24 percent decline in truck shipments and an increase in express and freight usage of 82 and 25 percent, respectively.

Iton

Roosipts of fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Chicago
December 1943

12 months 12 mos, 1943
Docombor compared with

Jan. -Doc. compared with 1943 Nov. 1943 Dec. 1942 1943 12 nos. 1942

Pounds Percent Percant Pounds Percont 3,355,000 -17

+ 10 42,412,000 + 18 2,464,000 +1

+ 34 29,916,000 + 37
1,205,000

-38
+ 18 11,706,000

+ 13
7,024,000 -17

+ 19 84,034,000 + 23

12 months Jan. -Doc.

1942 Pounds 35,913,000 21,913,000 10,341,000 68,167,000

378,000
447,000
607,000
374,000
243,000
168,000
318,000
246,000
748,000
197,000
470,000
960,000

-17 +31 -28 -59 +29 -33 +54

Classification:
Freshwater Fish
Salt-water fish
Shellfish, etc.

Total receipts

Important Itens:
Blue pike
Carp
Lala berring
Lalce trout
Sudler
hitefish
Yellow piko
Cod
Halibut
Rosefish fillots
Salmon
Shrimp

Leading Sources:
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Washington
Wi soonsin
British Columbia

Donostic total
Imported total

Transported by:
Truck
Lapress
Treight

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692,000
649,000
562,000
924,000

775,000
4,957,000
2,067,000

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+ 15

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+ 20
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1,685,000 1,900,000 3.439,000

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3

+ 25

VESSEL TIE-UP CAUSES BIG DROP IN NEW YORK RECEIPTS

Receipts in the New York salt-water market for December showed a decrease of 35 percent as compared with November, and a decrease of 9 percent from December 1942 figures, according to the Service's Market News office in New York. The decrease was due to the protest tie-up of fishing vessels during the entire month. Had this market not received greatly increased quantities of several varieties from southern points, the percentage of decrease would have been much higher.

Spanish mackerel receipts increased 180 percent over November 1943 and 340 percent over December 1942. Bluefish and croakers, less important items, increased markedly, but mullet, which had been received in liberal quantity from Florida during November, fell off during December, due to the closed season from December 1 to January 20 on this variety. Shellfish fell off 17 percent from November receipts, but increased 7 percent over December 1942. Due mainly to very cold weather during the week of December 13 to 18, the month's receipts of clams were considerably below normal for December.

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Receipts of fresh and Frozen Fishery Products--Salt-water Market, New York City

December Dec. compared with November December Item 1943 Nov. 1943 Dec, 1942 1943

1942 Classification:

Pounds Percent Percent Pounds Pounds Fish

8,948,000 • 43

18 15,799,000 10,856,000 Shellfish, etc.

6,143,000 - 17 + 7

7,431,000 5,765,000 Total receipts

15,091,000 • 35

9 23,230,000 16,621,000 Important Items: Cod

662,000 . 70 - 23

2,195,000 855,000 Tlounders: Blackbacks

543,000 71

.+ 14

1,860,000 477,000 Yellowtail

667,000

- 75

1,190,000 2,650,000 Haddock

44,000

1,221,000 454,000 Mackerel

313,000

1,003,000 744,000 Smelt

455,000

8

326,000 497,000 201,000 - 23 +118

261,000 92,000 Spanish mackerel

872,000 +180

+340

311,000 198,000 Whiting

1,037,000 - 40 + 10

1,717,000 939,000 Clans, hard

1,785,000 • 28

+ 7

2,479,000 1,673,000 Lobsters

531,000 + 20

441,000 429,000 1,535,000 28

+ 19 2,135,000 1,286,000 Arrivals By: Fishing vessels

1,557,000 946,000 Truck, freight, and express

15,091,000 30

21,673,000 15,675,000 Excluding imports entered at New York City.

- 90

58

+ 40

Scup

+ 24

Shrimp

GULF FISHERY PRODUCTION IN 1943 SHOWS LITTLE CHANGE FROM 1942

With the exception of hard crabs, the most important fishery products on the Gulf area were produced at about the same rate in 1943 as in 1942, according to the Service's Market News office at New Orleans. Production in December was considerably below November for all items except oysters. Oysters showed a seasonal increase, due to the opening of the canning season.

12 months Jan. Dec,

1942

N

187,285 173,051 360,336

390,268

Production of Fishery Products in the Gulf States*
December 1943

12 months Compared with Item

Unit Dec.
compared with

Jan Dec 12 months
1943 Nov. 1943 Dec, 1942 1943

1942
Percent Percent

Percent
Shrimp:
For canning

Bbls.
6,611

61

-59 138,874 -26 Other

19,855
50 +26

251,394 +45 Total

26,466
54 -17

+ 8
Oysters:
Tor canning

2,470 +707 -44 507,300 -11 Other 34,957 +] .3

298,641 +22 Total

37,427 + 13 .8 805,941 . Hard crabs

Lbs.

233,000 - 61 +33 8,847,000 -37 Crab meat, fresh cooked

25,000

. 64 +25 1,029,000 -29 Salt-water fish

N 518,000 • 57 -12 6,697,000 +11 Frosh-water fish

38,000 . 22 +46 653,000 +25 Includes production in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas,

567,206 244,032

811,238 14,148,000 1,450,000 6,039,000

52,000

SEATTLE FISH RECEIPTS MAKE LARGE GAIN IN 1943

Total receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products at Seattle during 1943 amounted to 83,896,000 pounds, according to the Service's local Fishery Market News office. This represents an increase of 19 percent over 1942. Halibut receipts of over 24 million pounds were more than 5 million pounds above the 1942 total, representing the greatest single increase. Although vessel landings of halibut at Seattle declined nearly 2 million pounds, shipments of fresh and frozen halibut from Alaska and British Columbia increased almost 7 million pounds. Other items which increased during the year were flounders and sole, which gained over 2 million pounds; lingcod, which was up nearly 3 million pounds; and rockfish, which increased over 2 million pounds. Salmon receipts at Seattle showed an alarming decline. Total receipts of all species of fresh and frozen salmon amounted to 17,230,000 pounds, a decline of 28 percent, or more than 6 million pounds less than the 1942 total. Failures of the fall salmon runs in Puget Sound and the Columbia River were responsible for most of this drop. Shipments of frozen salmon from Alaska were reduced nearly million pounds.

Seattle receipts of fresh and frozen fish during December totaled nearly 5 million pounds. This represents a decline of 26 percent compared with the previous month, but is an increase of more than 1 million pounds, or 30 percent over December 1942. Items received in larger quantities than in December 1942 were fresh-shucked Pacific oysters, chum salmon, flounders, crabs, and dogfish livers. Shipments of frozen fish from Alaska also increased.

Jan. -Dec. 12 months

1942 Pounds 70,711,000

Receipts of fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Seattle

December 1943

12 months 12 mos. 1943 Itam December compared with

Jan. -Dec, compared 1943 Nov. 1943 Dec. 1942 1943 12 nos. 1942 Classification:

Pounds Porcent Percent Pounds Percent Total fish and shellfish

5,337,000 -26

+ 30 83,8%,000 + 19 Important Items: Tlounders

248,000

+ 65 9,956,000 + Halibut

1,919,000 +88
+117 24,383,000

+ 28 Lingcod

205,000 -20
+ 15 8,676,000

+ 50 Rockfish

243,000 -11

+ 91 4,483,000 +150 Sablefish

209,000
-64
+ 6

5,198,000 + 2
Salmon:
Caun

312,000 -84

+192 3,163,000 - 49 Silver

422,000 -51
63 4,917,000

• 20 Oysters, Pacific, shucked

377,000 - 9 +148 2,486,000 +115 Halibut and shark fleets and receipts from local and all other sources.

7,712,000 19,12,000 5,766,000 1,791,000 4,307,000 6,150,000 6,166,000 1,158,000

OPA SETS RETAIL PRICE MARK-UPS FOR FRESH FISH SALES

To pass on to the consuming public the reductions in fish and seafood prices which already have been achieved at the fishermen's level and in wholesale stages prior to retail, the Office of Price Administration on January 14 announced a schedule of flat, nation-wide, cents-per-pound mark-ups over net cost by which retailers now must determine their maximum prices for fish, This move should bring about a return to approximately the 1942 retail average. It is expected that the new schedule will not mean an increase in any individual case. Up until now, OPA had required that retail maximum prices were to be determined by application of the individual retailer's customary mark-up. OPA has previously admitted, however, that this system has not been satisfactory. Surveys have shown retail prices advancing in an inflationary manner even after imposition of fisherman and wholesale controls. Exact savings in any city or store cannot be stated, since fish prices have varied exceedingly from store to store under the previous form of control.

Under the regulation (Maximum Price Regulation 507--Ceiling Prices of Certain Fresh Fish and Seafood Sold at Retail-effective January 27), the flat, cents-per-pound mark-ups will be applied much as the percentage mark-ups are applied to groceries and vegetables under OPA's now familiar over-all mark-up regulations for wholesale and retail grocers. The centsper-pound mark-up will vary according to the kind of fish, the dressing of that fish and the group of retail stores in which it is sold. (For the purposes of this regulation, OPA'S regular four groupings of retail stores have been lumped into Group 1 and Group 2, with one set of mark-ups, and Group 3 and Group 4 with another. Groups 1 and 2 combine all independent stores having a gross annual volume of less than $250,000; Groups 3 and 4, all chain stores and independents having a volume of more than $250,000.)

The mark-ups are provided for those 45 species of fish and for shrimp and scallop previously brought under control at other levels. Besides applying to retail stores, the regulation also covers sales by retail route sellers and wagon retailers.

The data upon which the mark-ups were established was gathered by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and, further, was obtained by OPA in industry conferences, of which many were held prior to the action. The BLS statistics, for instance, were compiled from 735 schedules submitted by 718 reporters retailing fish in 17 cities. The reporters included combination stores, fish markets, chain organizations, and super-markets, representing 4,100 stores.

The actual prices will vary from city to city depending upon the actual costs of transporting the fish to each point. It is to these costs that the retailer adds the mark-ups.

Incorporating many now familiar features of OPA's retail grocery regulations, with slight variations, such as those on recalculation of perishables, on transportation allowances, on posting of prices, etc., the regulation also has provisions peculiar to the fish trade. For instance, while cents-per-pound mark-ups are provided both for whole fish sold as purchased and for fillets and steaks sold as purchased, it is true that many retailers purchase their fish whole and then fillet it or cut their own steaks prior to offering for sale. In such an instance, the retailer determines his maximum price by adding to the wholesale price for fillets or steaks of the variety involved, the mark-up allowed for fillets sold as purchased. The same thing holds true where the retailer, for instance, processes some seafood by changing its form to headless, headless and veined, peeled, or peeled and veined. MPR 507 follows:

(Document No. 2681) Sec.

regulation if you are a retailer who buys

3. How and when you figure your ceiling and resells food products, for the most PART 1364_FRESH, CURED AND CANNED

prices for fresh fish and seafood. MEAT AND FISH PRODUCTS 4. Directions for Aguring ceiling prices for commercial, industrial or institutional

part to ultimate consumers who are not (MPR 507] fresh fish and seafood.

users. Ceiling prices for sales to hotels,

5. Prices which you must post. CHLING PRICES OF CERTAIN FRESH FISH AND 6. Indirect price increases prohibited. boarding houses, restaurants, instituSEAFOOD SOLD AT RETAIL 7. Prohibitions.

tions and other eating places selling or 8. Sales slips and receipts.

furnishing meals are the ceiling prices In the judgment of the Price Adminis- 9. Records.

fixed by Maximum Price Regulation No. trator, it is necessary, in order to ef- 10. Licensing.

418. Nevertheless, any person may, durfectuate the purposes of the Emergency 11. Notice of dollars-and-cents celling prices. ing any month, use the ceiling prices fixed Price Control Act of 1942, as amended, 12. Further provisions supplementing or ex

by this regulation in selling to eating and Executive Orders Nos. 9250 and 9328, plaining this regulation.

places, if 80% or more of his total sales that maximum prices be established for ARTICLE 11-SPECIAL PRICING PROVISIONS of fresh fish and seafood during the prethe sale of certain fresh fish and seafood 13. Additions for Groups 3 and 4 stores for vious calendar month were sales at retail at retail.

delivery from warehouse to store. to ultimate consumers. Retail route sellSo far as practicable, the Price Ad- 14. Additions allowed for deliveries made byers and wagon retailers shall, for the ministrator has consulted and advised "fish stores".

purposes of this regulation, regard themwith representative members of the in- 15. How you figure your ceiling price for selves as stores, and figure their ceiling dustry which will be affected by the regulation. In the judgment of the Price 16. How you figure your "net cost" for items prices as such.

which you import.

(b) What are Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 Administrator, prices established are

stores. For the purposes of this regulagenerally fair and equitable and will ef- ARTICLE 1-ADJUSTMENT PROVISIONS

tion, Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 stores are fectuate the purposes of the Act. The 17. How Groups 3 and 4 stores may, under defined as follows: prices established are not below the aver- certain conditions, use the Group 1 and (1) Group 1. Your store is in Group 1 age retail prices of fresh fish and seafood 2 mark-ups.

if it is an "independent" store with "anin the year 1941. 18. Applications for adjustment.

nual gross sales" of less than $50,000. Such specifications and standards as ARTICLE IV-MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS (2) Group 2. Your store is in Group 2 are used in this regulation were, prior 19. How you find the "annual gross sales" | if it is an “independent” store with “anto such use, in general use in the trade

of your store.

nual gross sales” of $50,000 or more, but or industry affected, or insofar as they 20. How you determine your group in cer- less than $250,000. were not in general use, their use is es- tain special cases.

(3) Group 3. Your store is in Group sential to effectuate price control, and 21. Taxes.

3 if its "annual gross sales" are less than there is no effective alternative.

22. Transfer of business and stock in trade. $250,000, and if it is not an “independent” A statement of the considerations in- 23. Relation to other regulations.

store. volved in the issuance of the regulation

24. Geographical applicability.
25. Definitions.

(4) Group 4. Your store is in Group has been issued herewith and filled with

4 if its "annual gross sales" are $250,000 the Division of the Federal Register.*

ARTICLE V-TABLES

or more. § 1364.352 Ceiling prices of certain 26. Table of mark-ups for fresh fish and sea- (5) Independent store. Your store is fresh fish and seafood, sold at retail.

food (Table A).

an "independent” store if it is not one Under the authority vested in the Price ARTICLE I-PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE

of four or more stores under one ownerAdministrator by the Emergency Price

ship whose combined "annual gross

REGULATION Control Act of 1942, as amended, and Ex

sales” are $500,000 or more.

SECTION 1. What this regulation does. ecutive Orders Nos. 9250 and 9328, Maxi. This regulation fixes new ceiling prices your store is in. At all times, you must

(C! How to post a sign of the group mum Price Regulation No. 507 (Ceiling Prices of Certain Fresh Fish and Seafood for domestic and imported fresh fish and have posted a sign showing the group Sold at Retail), which is annexed hereto retail stores, retail route sellers and (reading “OPA-1”, “OPA-2”, “OPA-3” or

seafood items listed in Table A, for all your store is in 'under this regulation and made a part hereof, is hereby issued. wagon retailers. These new ceiling prices "OPA-4”, whichever applies to you), or

AUTHORITY: : 1364.352 issued under 56 Stat. are to be used instead of the ceiling prices you must have posted a sign which the 23, 765; Pub. Law 161, 78th Cong. E.O. 9250, figured under any other price regulation OPA may furnish you. However, you 7 FR. 7871; E.O. 9323, 8 F.R. 4681.

or order issued by the Office of Price Ad- may post the sign of another group, if MAXIMUM PRICE REGULA.ION 507-CEILING ministration (hereinafter called OPA), you are permitted to do so under any PRICES OF CERTAIN FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD except as otherwise provided in any order order issued under Revised General SOLD AT RETAN

fixing dollars-and-cents ceiling prices Order No. 51. The sign must be posted ARTICLE -PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE which has been or which may be issued so that it can be clearly seen by your REGULATION

by the OPA pursuant to Revised General customers. Sec.

Order No. 51. 1. What this regulation does.

Sec. 3. How and when you figure your 2. What stores are covered by this regula- Sec. 2. What stores are covered by this ceiling prices for fresh fish and seajood

tion and how you find out what group regulation and how you find out what you are in.

group you are inmal What stores are .8 F.R. 9366, 10086, 10513, 10339, 11734,

covered. Your store is covered by this 11687, 12468, 12233, 12688, 13297, 13182, 13302, *Copies may be obtained from the Office

14048. 14475, 14616, 15257, 15430, 16131, 16293, of Price Administration.

19 FR. 108.

16296.

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