The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England, Bind 14

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W. Pickering, 1831
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Side 135 - But things which are equal to the same are equal to one another || ; therefore CA is equal to CB ; wherefore CA,
Side 34 - ... idols of the market, from the commerce and association of men with each other; for men converse by means of language, but words are formed at the will of the generality, and there arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. Nor can the definitions and explanations with which learned men are wont to guard and protect themselves in some instances afford a complete remedy — words still manifestly force the understanding, throw everything into confusion,...
Side 36 - Thus we cannot conceive of any end or external boundary of the world, and it seems necessarily to occur to us, that there must be something beyond. Nor can we imagine how eternity has flowed on down to the present day, since the usually received distinction of an infinity, a parte ante and a parte post, cannot hold good: for it would thence follow that one infinity is greater than another, and also that infinity is wasting away and tending to an end.
Side 31 - MAN, as the minister and interpreter of nature, does and understands as much, as his observations on the order of nature, either with regard to things or the mind, permit him, and neither knows nor is capable of more.
Side 68 - Mechanics in its raw state, but changes and works it in the Understanding. We have good reason therefore to derive hope from a closer and purer alliance of these faculties (the Experimental and Rational) than has yet been attempted.
Side 87 - It is the glory of God to conceal a thing : but the honour of kings is to search out a matter.
Side 368 - Hope is the most beneficial of all the affections, and doth much to the prolongation of life, if it be not too often frustrated, but entertaineth the fancy with an expectation of good ; therefore they which fix and propound to themselves some end, as the mark and scope of their life, and continually and by degrees go forward in the same, are, for the most part, long-lived ; insomuch that when they are come to the top of their hope, and can go no higher therein, they commonly droop, and live not long...
Side 39 - For men imagine that their reason governs words, whilst, in fact, words react upon the understanding ; and this has rendered philosophy and the sciences sophistical and inactive.
Side 35 - Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre. For we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a...

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