The Principles of Fruit-growing ...

Forsideomslag
Macmillan, 1897 - 508 sider
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Side 494 - LAWSON, WILLIAM. A NEW ORCHARD AND GARDEN; or, the best way for planting, grafting, and to make any ground good, for a rich orchard.
Side 153 - ... water,, it is evident that, other conditions being present, the largest aggregate surface area may retain the most water per cubic foot. Now, a cubic foot of marbles one inch in diameter possesses an aggregate surface of 27.7 square feet while if the marbles were reduced in diameter to one-thousandth of an inch, then the total area per cubic foot is increased to 37,700 square feet.
Side 102 - Blackberries are extensively laid down in colder climates, however, and it may be well to relate the method here for the benefit of those who occupy bleak locations. Late in fall, the bushes are tipped over and covered. Three men are generally employed to perform this labor. One man goes ahead with a long-handled, round-pointed shovel and digs the earth away six inches deep from under the roots. The second man has a six-tined or four-tined fork which he thrusts against the plant a foot or so above...
Side 209 - V shows that five bushels of apples remove, in round numbers, eleven pounds of nitrogen, nearly one pound of phosphoric acid, and sixteen pounds of potash, and that the leaves of a tree large enough to produce the apples would contain ten pounds of nitrogen, nearly three pounds of phosphoric acid, and ten pounds of potash, or a total of twenty-one pounds of nitrogen, three pounds of phosphoric acid, and twenty-six pounds potash.
Side 489 - THE FRUITS AND FRUIT TREES OF AMERICA, Or, the Culture, Propagation, and Management in the Garden and Orchard of Fruit Trees generally; with descriptions of all the finest varieties of fruit, native and foreign, cultivated In this country.
Side 375 - Dissolve the copper sulfate by putting it in a bag of coarse cloth and hanging this in a vessel holding at least four gallons, so that it is just covered by the water. Use an earthen or wooden vessel. Slake the lime in an equal amount of water. Then mix the two and add enough water to make 40 gallons. It is then ready for immediate use, but will keep for some time.
Side 373 - Boiling soft water 1 gallon Kerosene 2 gallons Dissolve the soap in the water, add the kerosene, and churn with a pump for 5 to 10 minutes. Dilute 4 to 25 times before applying.
Side 145 - ... it may contain. A clay soil which has been producing good crops for any number of years may be so seriously injured by one injudicious plowing in a wet time as to ruin it for the growing of crops for two or three years. The injury lies in the modification of its physical texture, not in the lessening of its plant-food.
Side 221 - A system of manuring for cultivated orchards, based upon the limited data at our disposal, may be outlined as follows: To provide vegetable matter and to improve the physical quality of poor soils, apply yard manure once in four years, in fall or winter, at the rate of from five to ten tons per acre. To aid in the decomposition of vegetable matter, and to insure a sufficiency of lime as plant food, apply lime at the rate of twenty-five bushels per acre once in five years.

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