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who are near the patient; but I must say, that wherever I have seen this tried, it has rather heightened the disorder, by bringing . on fits. The same thing may be said of obedience, or letting the patient have her own way. This is precisely like giving drink in . a dropsical case, or curing a burning fever by throwing in great quantities of brandy.

As the chief intention of this paper was, to prove that scolding is a disease, and not a fault, I shall not enlarge much on the mode of cure; because, the moment my theory is adopted, every person will be able to treat the disorder secundum artem. I shall mention, however, the following prescription, which I never found to fail, if properly administered: Take-Of Common Sense, thirty grains,

Decent Behaviour, one scruple,

Due Considrration, ten grains. Mix, and sprinkle the whole with one moment's thought, to be takın as soon as any of the occasional causes appear.

By way of diet, though it is not necessary to restrict the patient to a milk or vegetable diet, yet I have always found it proper to guard them against strong or spirituous liquors, or any thing that tends to heat the blood.

But it is now expedient that I should state a matter of very great importance in the prevention of this disorder, and which I have left till now, that my arguments on the subject may appear distinct, and may be comprehended under one view. It is commonly supposed, and, indeed, has often been asserted, that this disorder is peculiar to one only of the sexes: and, I trust, I need not add, what sex that is. , Lut although it may be true that they are most liable to it, yet it is certain, from the theory laid down rcspecting the predisposing causes, that the men are equally in dan.. ger. Why then do we not find as many males afflicted with scold. ing as we do females? For this plain reason;--scolding, as proved above, is the effect of a certain noxious matter pent up. Now this matter engenders in men, as well as in women; but the latter have not the frequent opportunities for discharging it, which the men enjoy. Women are, by fashion and certain confined modes of life, restrained from all those public companies, clubs, assemblies, coffee-houses, &c. &c. where the men have a continual opportunity of discharging the cause of the disorder, without its ever accumulating in so great a quantity as to produce the symptoms I have enumerated. This, and this only, is the cause why the disease appears most often in the female sex I would propose, therefore, if I were a legislator, or if I had influence enough to set a fashion, that the ladies should, in all respects, imitate the societies of the men; that they should have their clubs, their coffeehouses, disputing societies, and even their parliament. In such places, they would be able to take that species of exercise that tends to keep down the disorder, which at present accumulates VOL. IV.

UW

in confinement, and, when nature attempts a discharge, the explosion is attended with all the violence and irregularities I have be. fore enumerated.

Thus much I have ventured to 'advance respecting scolding, and I hope that I shall succeed in abating the unreasonable prejudices which have been fostered by an affected superiority in our sex, joined to a portion of ignorance, which, to say the least, renders that superiority a matter of great doubt. I have only to add, that my motives for all this have been perfectly disinterested, and that I shall be very happy to give advice to any person labouring under the disorder. Letters (post paid) may be addressed to

Celsus BOERHAAVE, M. D.

TRANSLATION OF A TEXT IN SCRIPTURE.

· To the Editor of the Athenæum. Sir-The late Dr. Campbell, Principal of Marischall College, Aberdeen, who published a new Translation of the four Gospels, with notes, &c. has the following note on chap. x. v. 30, of the Gospel of St. John:

« 30. I and the Father are one, sy% xar ó math ey come. The word is not ins one person, but év one thing, or the same thing. It might have been so rendered here; but the expression is too homely, in the opinion of some excellent critics, to suit the dignity of the subject. The greater part of foreign interpreters have thought otherwise. Vulg. Erasm. Zuric, Castalio, Beza, have Ego ei Pa. ter unum sumus, Luther, Ich und der Vater sind eins. Diodati, Io ed il Padre siamo una iste88@ Cosa. Le Clerc, Mon Pere er moi sommes une seule Chose. Port Royal, Simon and Saci, Une meme Chose.

“ What is distinguished in the original, we ought, if possible, to distinguish. Yet no English translator known to me has, in this, chosen to desert the common translation.”

These reasons appear to have influenced Dr. Campbell in retaining the old translation, but it may perhaps be worth recording, that the true rendering of the word was adopted more than forty years ago by an anonymous translator, who published a new version of the four Gospels and Acts of the Apostles in the year 1761, under the following title.

« Divers Parts of the Holy Scriptures, done into English, chiefly from Dr. J. Mill's printed Greek copy. With Notes and Maps. London, printed for T. Piety, at the Rose and Crown, Paternoster Row."

This translator gives the words * I and the Father are one Thing;" and it should seem as if this was the first English translation in which the true rendering was given.

The translation in question is probably very little known, at least neither Dr. Campbell nor the Archbishop of Armagh (Dr. Newcome) who gives a long catalogue of translations of the Scriptures, take any notice of this. From a manuscript note of the author in the copy which I possess, there is reason to belicve that it was the work of a dissenting minister: respecting the merits of the translation I pretend not to judge; it renders some passages much clearer than they are in the commonly received translation, and the arrangement of the letter-press is calculated to make the whole extremely perspicuous to the reader; in this respect it is superior to any other which it has fallen to my lot to see.

'Iragarbewtos. M. F. March 4, 1807.

MRS. ELIZABETH HAMILTON. Mrs. ELIZABETH HAMILTON was born at Belfast, in Ireland; and the affection for her country, which she constantly expressed, proved that she had a true Irish heart. She was well-known to the public as the author of “ The Cottagers of Glenburnie,” “ The Modern Philosophers,” “ Letters on Female Education,” and various other works. She has obtained in different departments of literature, just celebrity, and has established a reputation that will strengthen and consolidate from the duration of time that destroyer of all that is false or superficial.

The most popular of her lesser works is the “Cottagers of Glenburnie," a lively and humorous picture of the slovenly habits, the indolent winna-be-fashed temper, the baneful content which prevails among some of the lower class of people in Scotland. It is a proof of the great merit of this book, that it has, in spite of the Scottish dialect with which it abounds, been universally read in England and Ireland, as well as in Scotland. It is a faithful representation of human nature in general, as well as of local manners and customs; the maxims of economy and industry, the principles of truth, justice, family affection and religion, which it inculcates by striking examples, and by exquisite strokes of pathos, mixed with humour, are independent of all local peculiarity of manner or language, and operate upon the feelings of every class of readers, in all countries. In Ireland in particular, the history of the “ Cottagers of Glenburnie” has been read with peculiar avidity; and it has probably done as much good to the Irish as to the Scotch. While the Irish have seized and enjoyed the opport ty it afforded of a good humoured laugh at their Scotch "15" bours, they have secretly seen, through shades of differ s a semblance to themselves; and are conscious that I names, the tale might be told of them. In this cake, ference and the resemblance between Srotis:

resemblance between Scotish and Hibernian faults or foibles are advantageous to its pularity in Ireland. I

in confinement, and, when nature attempts a discharge, the explosion is attended with all the violence and irregularities I have be. fore enumerated.

Thus much I have ventured to advance respecting scolding, and I hope that I shall succeed in abating the unreasonable preju. dices which have been fostered by an affected superiority in our sex, joined to a portion of ignorance, which, to say the least, renders that superiority a matter of great doubt. I have only to add, that my motives for all this have been perfectly disinterested, and that I shall be very happy to give advice to any person labouring under the disorder. Letters (post paid) may be addressed to

CELSUS BOERHAAVE, M. D.

TRANSLATION OF A TEXT IN SCRIPTURE.

- To the Editor of the Atheneum. Sir-The late Dr. Campbell, Principal of Marischall College, Aberdeen, who published a new Translation of the four Gospels, with notes, &c. has the following note on chap. x. v. 30, of the Gospel of St. John:

« 30. I and the Father are one, sy w xei o marne v Eury. The word is not lis one person, but év one thing, or the same thing. It might have been so rendered here; but the expression is too homely, in the opinion of some excellent critics, to suit the dignity of the subject. The greater part of foreign interpreters have thought otherwise. Vulg. Erasm. Zuric, Castalio, Beza, have Ego et Pa. ter unum sumus, Luther, Ich und der Vater sind eins. Diodati, Io ed il Padre siamo una istesse Cosa. Le Clerc, Mon Pere er moi sommes une seule Chosc. Port Royal, Simon and Saci, Une meme Chose.

" What is distinguished in the original, we ought, if possible, to distinguish. Yet no English translator known to me has, in this, chosen to desert the common translation.”

These reasons appear to have influenced Dr. Campbell in retaining the old translation, but it may perhaps be worth recording, that the true rendering of the word was adopted more than forty years ago by an anonymous translator, who published a new version of the four Gospels and Acts of the Apostles in the year 1761, under the following title.

« Divers Parts of the Holy Scriptures, done into English, chiefly from Dr. J. Mill's printed Greek copy. With Notes and Maps. London, printed for T. Piety, at the Rose and Crown, Paternoster Row."

This translator gives the words * I and the Father are one Thing;" and it should seem as if this was the first English translation in which the true rendering was given.

The translation in question is probably very little known, at least neither Dr. Campbell nor the Archbishop of Armagh (Dr. Newcome) who gives a long catalogue of translations of the Scriptures, take any notice of this. From a manuscript note of the author in the copy which I possess, there is reason to believe that it was the work of a dissenting minister: respecting the merits of the translation I pretend not to judge; it renders some passages much clearer than they are in the commonly received translation, and the arrangement of the letter-press is calculated to make the whole extremely perspicuous to the reader; in this respect it is superior to any other which it has fallen to my lot to see.

Ιλαρανθρωπος. M. F. March 4, 1807.

MRS. ELIZABETH HAMILTON. Mrs. ELIZABETH Hamilton was born at Belfast, in Ireland; and the affection for her country, which she constantly expressed, proved that she had a true Irish heart. She was well-known to the public as the author of “ The Cottagers of Glenburnie,” “ The Modern Philosophers," “ Letters on Female Education," and various other works. She has obtained in different departments of literature, just celebrity, and has established a reputation that will strengthen and consolidate from the duration of time that destroyer of all that is false or superficial.

The most popular of her lesser works is the “ Cottagers of Glenburnie," a lively and humorous picture of the slovenly habits, the indolent winna-be.fashed temper, the baneful content which prevails among some of the lower class of people in Scotland. It is a proof of the great merit of this book, that it has, in spite of the Scottish dialect with which it abounds, been universally read in England and Ireland, as well as in Scotland. It is a faithful representation of human nature in general, as well as of local manners and customs; the maxims of economy and industry, the principles of truth, justice, family affection and religion, which it inculcates by striking examples, and by exquisite strokes of pathos, mixed with humour, are independent of all local peculiarity of manner or language, and operate upon the feelings of every class of readers, in all countries. In Ireland in particular, the history of the “ Cottagers of Glenburnie” has been read with peculiar avidity; and it has probably done as much good to the Irish as to the Scotch. While the Irish have seized and enjoyed the opportuille ty it afforded of a good humoured laugh at their Scotch weighbours, they have secretly seen, through shades of differunce, a resemblance to themselves; and are conscious that, changing the names, the tale might be told of them. In this cale, both the ditference and the resemblance between Sruttish and Hibernian faults or foibles are advantageous to its ripularity in Ireland. The

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