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AQUA MARINA.
C. Wesselhæft, M.D., Pub. Mass. Hom. Med. Soc., vol. iv, p. 31.

Sea-water causes constant hawking and raising of phlegm, white and tough, like cotton.

ARALIA RACEMOSA.
Aralia racemosa, L.
Natural order, Araliaceae.
Common name, Spikenard (American name).

Authority. S. A. Jones, M.D., Hale's New Remedies, third edition, p. 471. At 3 P.M., I took 10 drops of the mother tincture in 2 ounces of water.

On retiring at 12 P.M., felt as well as I ever did. Had vo sooner laid down than I was seized with a fit of asthma. I had laid upon my back when the following symptoms had supervened : Dry wheezing respiration, sense of impending suffocation, and rapidly increasing dyspnea. Very loud musical whistlings during both inspiration and expiration, but louder during inspiration. The attack soon reached its acme, and phlegm began to come up. It was scanty, but each expectoration was attended with a sensation that more would soon follow. My wife now observed that my wbeezing was so labored as to make the whole bed vibrate. Could not possibly lie down; felt that I would suffocate if I did not sit up. Phlegm began to come freer and more abundantly; had a markedly salty taste, and felt quite warm in the mouth. Right lung appeared to be more oppressed than the left.

When the worst of the attack was over I lay on my right side, and then it seemed as if all the oppression and discomfort was in the right lung. Shortly after I turned over, and soon it felt as if my left lung was affected, while the right was entirely relieved.

It took a long time for me to come to.” Had a constant desire to clear the chest of something, so that I could inspire better. All the obstruction seemed to be in inspiration. On making a forcible expiration, in the attempt to clear the chest, had a raw, burning, sore feeling behind the whole length of the sternum, and in each lung, most intense behind the sternum. Slept well all night. After rising in the morning, raised some loose phlegm easily.

I ain inclined to asthma, and at first thought this one of its attacks; but as the phenomena were evolved, the programme was so different that my drink of Aralia flashed into memory.

On the night of the 28th, I was literally drenched with perspiration while asleep. Was wakened by a patient, when it passed off and did not

recur.

29th. I have been annoyed all day by a dread that my right lung is seriously diseased. Could not shake off the fear. Cough now and then, raising a little phlegm, which is involuntarily swallowed. Took 10 drops of the tincture at 1.30 A.M. No

symptoms that night. On rising at 8.30, bowels felt as they have done after a large-sized " spree.” Faintly defined nausea in throat and stomach, and sensation in intestines as if diarrhea would set in. At 3.15 P.M. went to closet, expecting from my feelings a loose stool. Evacuation was soft, yellow, about a teaspoonful in quantity, and expelled with great difficulty. Mucous inembrane of rectum came down like a tumor. (Have had hæmorrhoids.) After stool, and while sitting on the “ throne,” an aching pain in the rectum, extending upwards, and on the left side.

Feel weak, prostrated, half sick, and filled with a vague pausea.

ARANEA.

Authorities. 1, La. Clivique (Bost. Med. and Surg. Journ., vol. iii, 1830, p. 167), a lady applied a plaster made of equal parts of the domestic spider and treacle, for toothache; 2, National Recorder, Phila. (Am. Journ. of Med. Sci., vol. xix, 1836, p. 267), a man was stung by a spider on his foot, death ; 3, Isaac Halse, M.D., Am. Journ. Med. Sci., vol. xxiv, 1839, p. 69, Mr. Q., was stung on the glans penis by a large dark-brown spider, covered with hairs over the legs and body; 4, F. Grinnell, M.D., Cincin. Lancet and Obs., vol. xix, 1876, p. 900, Mrs. W., was bitten on the tongue by a black spider (variety, Saltacus familiaris).

In ten to twelve hours, the hand, forearm, and lower half of the arm became swollen and extremely pallid, of a dark-yellowish color, and covered with a multitude of vesicles, accompanied by fever and anxiety. These symptoms lasted for six weeks,'.—The next day the lymphatic streaks were perceptible as high up as his knee, on which was a purple swelling, -In one hour, writhing under the most acute suffering. Vomiting with great violence, and complaining of deepseated pain in the abdomen, extending up into the chest, and of sensations of choking and suffocation. The vessels of the back and neck were greatly distended, and of a dark hue. Pains and spasms along the spine and extremities,':- Instantly a painful sensation, as though arising from several points, darted along the tongue, painfully affecting the tongue, jaws, and head. The effects were instantaneous, and were compared to a shock from an electric battery. The tongue seemed almost paralyzed, the utterance thick and heavy, and the pains at the root of the tongue and in the lower jaw, especially at its articulation with the temporal bones, were most excruciating,*

ARGEMONE.

Argemone Mexicana, L.
Natural order, Papaveraceæ.
Common naume, Prickly poppy.

Barham, Hort. Amer., p. 152 (Pharm. Journ., vol. iv, p. 167), a negro smoked a quantity of the seeds.

Before he had smoked out his pipe, he fell into a sound sleep; not easily awakened.

ARGENTUM NITRICUM. The following, taken from the original, is deemed worthy of insertion, in place of the fragmentary reference in volume i.

Das silber, Arzn. betrachet. Dr. Krahmer, Halle, 1845, p. 84. Quoted experiments of Schachert, Diss. de usu Argenti nitrici intermo, Regimont, 1837.

He took š grain of Nitrate of silver in distilled water, frequently repeating the dose; slight burning in the stomach. Afterwards took $ grain,

severe.

then } grain, daily. The burning sensation in the stomach became quite

The tongue showed in various places a dark-bluish color, and in the stomach there wa a sensation of increased warmth and some nausea ; these symptoms disappeared after taking food. The stools and pulse were not affected. Some time after this, Schachert increased the doses to a grain, which he took an hour and a half after dinner. The burning in the throat was very severe. The tongue showed for several days a dirty-brown color. The warmth in the stomach increased to nausea and retching, without actual vomiting, and after a few hours gave place to a persistent, periodically aggravated sensation of compression in the stomach. Towards evening diarrhea set in, and continued during the next day, with relief of the pressure in the stomach. The evacuations seemed thin, but their color was normal. In addition to these sometimes there was a distressing dull headache, seated especially in the forehead, and associated with a certain prostration and restlessness. Changes in respiration, pulse, and secretion of urine were not marked. On the third day all the symptoms of the drug action had disappeared. Eight days afterwards Schachert took 11 grain in the morving fasting. He experienced nausea and efforts to vomit. He felt unwell through the day and suffered from dull headache.

Krahmer's experiments on himself, p. 119.-When I began my experiment I was quite well and strong, but afterwards was sick, and my stomach suffered for many days after I had discontinued the use of the silver; I frequently had heartburn, from which I had never before suffered, though these symptoms gradually disappeared. But in their place there soon appeared an almost uninterrupted neuralgic pain in the left infraorbital region, which for some moments became most terribly severe, and lasted with interruptions the whole following winter. At the same time the action of the heart became irregular, and the beats at times omitted, when I had a distinct disagreeable sensation in the chest. To this was added a constant sensation of faintness in the præcordial region. I found that on turning my attention to the action of the heart its irregularity became more marked, but on moving about freely the sensation at times entirely disappeared. Upon my disposition these symptoms had no effect. The paroxysms of anxiety at the heart were not associated with it. Physical movement was uninterrupted, only sudden violent muscular action, as for example, jumping or rapid running upstairs, or after emotional excitement, caused violent palpitation ; the disagreeable sensations were least marked in a horizontal position, and in the evening in bed. Sleep was rarely disturbed by palpitation. Towards the end of the winter the attacks diminished in intensity. Physical signs of anything abnormal about the heart were entirely wanting, as I was assured by an eminent medical friend. The next summer all morbid symptoms had entirely disappeared. That these changes in my condition were really the results of the silver I have no manner of doubt; there is no other explanation of them, and I make this communication in hope that my colleagues, who may have the opportunity to make similar observations, may be able to verify them.

In observing the action of silver I have endeavored as far as possible to pay attention not only to all the subjective, but also to all the objective symptoms; changes in the pulse, temperature, and character of the urine have been especially observed. I lacked the proper apparatus to ascertain the amount of carbonic acid eliminated by respiration.

My average pulse in the morning after rising was 66; at noon, soon after returning from my visits, 72; and in the evening, ordinarly 68. A strict milk diet for more than two weeks had no effect upon the character of the pulse. My temperature is from 29.6° to 30° R. 'I examined the urine, keeping account of the total amount, specific gravity, amount of water, quantity of uric acid, urea, and incinerated salts.

In order to have correct data, I examined the urine from the 6th to the 19th of October. I rise at 6 A.M., breakfast on two cups of coffee, am busy reading or writing till 9, visit patients till 1, then take dinner; work till 5 in my office, make evening visits, take supper at 8, go to bed about 11. Noon and evening I usually drink a glass of beer or wine. From October 19th to November 6th, I kept a very strict regular diet ; took daily 2293.7 grams of fresh milk, and 418.5 grams of white bread.

October 26th, I took 0.1 grain crystals four times ; 27th, same; 28th, 0.2 grain ; 29th, the same; 30th, 0.3 grain four times; 31st, 0.4 grain four times; November 1st, 0.5 grain four times; 20, 0.6 grain four times; 3d, 0.8 grain four times; 4th, 1 grain four times; 5th, 5 grain four times.

A consequence of the strict diet was that the stools, which are usually regular, were affected, so that October 21st, one was evacuated only after violent and painful effort, and on the 23d there was no voluntary stool. After several hours' effort to evacuate hard fæces, I took 1 ounce of castor oil. In the evening there was a hard painful stool, and the next morning a pasty stool. On the 25th, repeated the oil, and the night of the 25th and 26th, took in addition an extra { ounce of the oil. On the 28th again took oil, also on the 29th, and from the 29th to the 2d of November, I took daily a teaspoonful of castor oil, so that the stools continued without great difficulty. After November 30, I did not require the oil, because

3d the large amount of silver nitrate kept the fæces soft. November 20, my stomach began to suffer. At noon, atter taking milk and bread, I experienced a pressing sensation of fulness in the epigastric region. November 3d, especially towards evening, the whole abdomen was very tense. November 4th, there was violent headache, and I could scarcely force myself to take the necessary amount of nourishment. The night was restless ; I could not remain in bed after 4 o'clock. November 5th, I was still more averse to food, though the taste was natural and the tongue not coated. Through the day I had violent headache. The following night was very restless. I rose at 3 o'clock, and took nothing but a glass of milk before poon. The headache was very violent. In the afternoon, after passing the last quantity of urine for examination, I took two cups of strong black coffee, after which I felt quite relieved. Supper was relished, but the next day I could take but a very small quantity of food on account of heartburn. The action of the silver seemed to cause a sensation of satiety, and my stomach seemed to need less pourishment than in a state of bealth. In the morning I took | grain in a pill form with white sugar dry on the tongue. I immediately experienced a very bitter taste, followed by warmth in the tip of the tongue, then in the pharynx, after which these two symptoms seemed to alternate with each other. I drank a little distilled water, which was followed by slight eructations, and a sensation of catarrh in the fauces and larynx. At noon, before dinner, I dissolved my dose in a drachm of distilled water. I experienced a sweetish taste and feeling of warmth in the mouth. Three hours after dinner took š grain in distilled water. The sensations were the same as before, but perhaps more severe. The scraping sensation in the pharynx provoked hawking and coughing. After a quarter of an hour I had a sensation of warmth between the scapulæ and sternum, which gradually became a pinching and slight pressure in the epigastric region. This was followed by tasteless eructations. The next morving I took 1 grain in water, and had only a very bitter taste. After ten minutes there was only very transient nausea.

The relation of the urea to the solid constituents in my case is somewhat less than the average given by Simon in his Handbook. I had an average of 26.3 per cent. of urea, perhaps dependent upon the peculiarity of my diet, which is generally vegetable. Under the effects of the milk diet this per cent. rose to 37.6, and the amount of uric acid became quite small, which during my ordinary diet was 0.6, but was now reduced to 0.045; the amount of solid constituents was not essentially changed by the silver, nor was the amount of urea perceptibly changed; the average was 33.5 per cent.; the whole amount daily excreted was 1.5 gram. Uric acid entirely disappeared from the urive under the influence of the silver. The amount of incinerated salts during the milk diet remained very constant. After several days'use of the silver it rose slightly. In the evening of November 6th, there was found 0.127 gram of pure silicic acid; so far as I know no analysis of urine has shown a like amount of silicic acid. No changes were noticed in the circulation or temperature. Silver was not found in the urine.

"ARISTOLOCHIA COLOMBIANA.” So called by Higgins in his “ Ophidians," is an unknown plant; it is not possible to identify it; hence the symptoms given by Dr. Higgins have no place in this work.

The same remark applies to “a proving” of Ampelopsis trifoliata, published recently in the Investigator.

ARNICA.

Authorities. 40, J. Epps, M.D., Lancet, 1810-1 (2), p. 365, a lady applied the tincture to corns ; 41, Dr. Morrison, Month. Hom. Rev., 1873, p. 471, Miss 0. B., suffering from toothache, rubbed in some mother tincture; 42, 43, 44, Jas. C. White, M.D., Bost. Med. and Surg. Journ., vol. xcii, 1875, p. 61, cases of poisonous action of the tincture on the skin; 45, E. W. Berridge, U. S. Med. Invest., New Ser., vol. iv, 1876, p. 573, a boy took 200th (Lehrmann); 46, same, a boy, æt. nine years, a patient, took 1000th (Jen.); 47, J. Fayrer, M.D., Practitioner, vol. xvi, 1876, p. 52, effects of application of tincture; (48 to 58, A. Inbert Gourbevre, M.D., Memoir on Arnica, addressed to the World's Hom. Con., at Philad., 1876); 48, Madame C. took two tablespoonfuls ; 49, a man, æt. sixty-nine years, fell five or six meters, and felt so bruised that he took a dose of a decoction of 30 grams of Arnica flowers in two glasses of water; 50, Ferrand, Journ. de Chim. Med., Sept., 1869, a man, æt. thirty years, swallowed 15 grams of the tincture; 51, Ferrand, Journ. de Chim. Med., Sept., 1869, a woman took two cups of an infusion prepared with a pint of the flowers; 52, Berlin, Central f. d. Med. Wissen, Nov., 1874, a workman swallowed at one draught 60 to 80 cc. of the tincture, death in thirty-eight hours; 53, Beilt, Diet

. des Sci. Med., 1812, a man was gorged with a decoction of the flowers after a fall; 54, Guillemot, Etude sur les Prop. Physiol. et Therap. d l'Ar

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