A glossary of the Cleveland dialect

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Populære passager

Side 546 - Sirat. which they say is laid over the midst of hell, and described to be finer than a hair, and sharper than the edge of a sword...
Side 327 - These, when a child haps to be got, Which after proves an idiot, When folks perceive it thriveth not, The fault therein to smother, Some silly doating brainless calf, That understands things by the half, Says that the fairy left this aulf, And took away the other.
Side 391 - A young woman, living in the neighbourhood of Holsworthy, having for some time past been subject to periodical fits of illness, endeavoured to effect a cure by attendance at the afternoon service at the parish church, accompanied by thirty young men, her near neighbours. Service over, she sat in the porch of the church, and each of the young men, as they passed out in succession, dropped a penny into her lap ; but the last, instead of a penny, gave her half-a-crown, taking from her the twenty-nine...
Side 429 - And how, of thousand snakes, each one Was changed into a coil of stone When holy Hilda pray'd ; Themselves, within their holy bound, Their stony folds had often found. They told how sea-fowls...
Side 547 - Our people all believe that the spirit lives in a future state ; that it has a great distance to travel after death towards the west — that it has to cross a dreadful deep and rapid stream, which is hemmed in on both sides by high and rugged hills — over this stream, from hill to hill, there lies a long and slippery pine-log, with the bark peeled off, over which the dead have to pass to the delightful-hunting grounds.
Side 541 - Christe receive thy saule. When thou from hence away are paste,. Every night and alle ; To Whinny-muir thou comest at laste ; And Christe receive thye saule. If ever thou gavest hosen and shoon, Every night and alle ; Sit thee down, and put them on ; And Christe receive thye saule. If hosen and shoon thou ne'er gavest nane, Every night and alle : The whinnes shall pricke thee to the bare...
Side 43 - Lue, (for she herself had been well washed in the water,) caused two stone bridges to be builded, of the which, one was situated over Lue, at the head of the town of Stratford, now called Bow, because the Bridge was arched like a bow ; a rare piece of worke ; for before that time the like had never been seen in England.
Side 544 - ... they are of beliefe (such is their fondnesse) that once in their lives, it is good to give a pair of new shoes to a poor man. for...
Side 548 - He was carried thence to a fair plain, where he saw thieves carrying heavy collars of iron, red hot, about their necks, hands, and feet. He saw here a great burning pitchy river, issuing from hell, and an iron bridge over it, which appeared very broad and easy for the virtuous to pass ; but when sinners attempted it, it became narrow as a thread, and they fell over into the river, and afterwards attempted it again, but were not allowed to pass until they had been sufficiently boiled to purge them...
Side x - The study of words may be tedious to the school-boy, as breaking of stones is to the wayside labourer, but to the thoughtful eye of the geologist these stones are full of interest — he sees miracles on the high road, and reads chronicles in every ditch. Language, too, has marvels of her own, which she unveils to the inquiring glance of the patient student. There are chronicles below her surface, there are sermons in every word. Language has been called sacred ground, because it is the deposit of...

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