The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783, Bind 1

Forsideomslag
S. Low, Marston, 1890 - 557 sider
Influential classic of naval history and tactics still used as text in war colleges. Read by Kaiser Wilhelm, both Roosevelts, other leaders. First paperback edition. 4 maps. 24 battle plans.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - nandadevi - LibraryThing

Well sometimes a classic is book that is good to own, but not to read. Innovative as it might have been in it's day, it's more significant on reflection for creating history (arguably being an ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - dcornwall - LibraryThing

Such a hard long slog, but useful points were made. Especially about the roots of sea power and how sometimes the best way to seize land is to hold the seas. Some of the book has been overtaken by ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

Indhold

I
1
II
25
III
90
IV
139
V
173
VI
201
VII
232
VIII
254
IX
281
X
330
XI
359
XII
401
XIII
419
XIV
468
XV
505
Copyright

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Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 397 - In any operation, and under all circumstances, a decisive naval superiority is to be considered as a fundamental principle, and the basis upon which every hope of success must ultimately depend.
Side 112 - The Second in Command will, after my intentions are made known to him, have the entire direction of his Line to make the attack upon the Enemy, and to follow up the blow until they are captured or destroyed.
Side 25 - ... a wide common, over which men may pass in all directions, but on which some well-worn paths show that controlling reasons have led them to choose certain lines of travel rather than others.
Side 138 - It is not the taking of individual ships or convoys, be they few or many, that strikes down the money power of a nation ; it is the possession of that overbearing power on the sea which drives the enemy's flag from it, or allows it to appear only as a fugitive...
Side 400 - No land force can act decisively, unless it is accompanied by a maritime superiority ; nor can more than negative advantages be expected without it. For proof of this, we have only to recur to the instances of the ease and facility with which the British shifted their ground, as advantages were to be obtained at either extremity of the continent...
Side iv - has there been witnessed the struggle of the highest individual genius against the resources and institutions of a great nation, and in both cases the nation has been victorious. For seventeen years Hannibal strove against Rome ; for sixteen years Napoleon Bonaparte strove against England : the efforts of the first ended in Zama ; those of the second in Waterloo.
Side 1 - On the other hand, wars arising from other causes have been greatly modified in their conduct and issue by the control of the sea. Therefore the history of sea power, while embracing in its broad sweep all that tends to make a people great upon the sea or by the sea, is largely a military history; and it is in this aspect that it will be mainly, though not exclusively, regarded in the following pages.
Side 532 - I beg to inform your lordship, that the port of Toulon has never been blockaded by me : quite the reverse. Every opportunity has been offered the enemy to put to sea : for it is there that we hope to realize the hopes and expectations of our country.
Side 82 - The government by its policy can favor the natural growth of a people's industries and its tendencies to seek adventure and gain by way of the sea; or it can try to develop such industries and such sea-going bent, when they do not naturally exist; or, on the other hand, the government may by mistaken action check and fetter the progress which the people left to themselves would make.
Side 225 - Before that war England was one of the sea powers ; after it she was the sea power, without any second.

Om forfatteren (1890)

Alfred Thayer Mahan was born on September 27, 1840 at West Point, New York, where his father was a professor of Civil and Military Engineering at the U.S. Military Academy. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1859 and embarked on a nearly 40-year naval career seeing duty in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico against the Confederacy. He taught briefly at Annapolis, but spent most of his academic career at the newly founded Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he eventually served as president. He wrote twenty books during his lifetime including The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783; The Influence of Sea Power upon the French Revolution and Empire, 1793-1812; The Interest of America in Sea Power, Present and Future; The Life of Nelson; and The Major Operations of the Navies in the War of American Independence. He died on December 1, 1914.

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