Preventing Drug Abuse:: What Do We Know?

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National Academies Press, Jan 1, 1993 - Medical - 176 pages
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As the nation's drug crisis has deepened, public and private agencies have invested huge sums of money in prevention efforts. Are the resulting programs effective? What do we need to know to make them more effective? This book provides a comprehensive overview on what we know about drug abuse prevention and its effectiveness, including

  • Results of a wide range of antidrug efforts.
  • The role and effectiveness of mass media in preventing drug use.
  • A profile of the drug problem, including a look at drug use by different population groups.
  • A review of three major schools of prevention theory--risk factor reduction, developmental change, and social influence.
  • An examination of promising prevention techniques from other areas of health and human services.

This volume offers provocative findings on the connection between low self-esteem and drug use, the role of schools, the reality of changing drug use in the population, and more.

Preventing Drug Abuse will be indispensable to anyone involved in the search for solutions, including policymakers, antidrug program developers and administrators, and researchers.

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About the author (1993)

Lawrence W. Green served on the public health and medical faculties of UC Berkeley, Hopkins, Texas, British Columbia, and is currently at the University of California at San Francisco as Program Leader for the Social and Behavioral Sciences for the UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has been a Visiting Professor at Berkeley, Harvard, Emory, the University of Maryland at College Park, the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands, the Shanghai Medical University in China, Lansdowne Scholar at the University of Victoria in Canada, and Chancellor's Best Practices Scholar at the University of Newcastle in Australia. Dr. Green served the Carter Administration as the first Director of the Office of Health Information and Health Promotion, and the Clinton Administration as Acting Director of the Office of Smoking and Health at CDC. He retired in 2004 from CDC as Director of the Office of Science and Extramural Research. He received the highest awards of the American Public Health Association (Award of Excellence, the Mayhew Derryberry Award, and Distinguished Career Award), the American Academy of Health Behavior Research (first Research Laureate Medal), the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (the Doyen Jacques Perisot Medal), the American Association for Health Education (the Presidential Citation, the Scholar Award, and the Alliance Scholar), and the American School Health Association (Honorary Lifetime Fellow).

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